Library and Information Technician


The Library and Information Technician program at Algonquin College is one of the only programs of its kind offered in Eastern Ontario. This program provides students with a broad range of knowledge and experience, with an emphasis on cataloguing.

Mobile DeviceBring Your Own Device (BYOD): As a student in this on-campus program, you will require a mobile computing device that meets the specifications outlined by your program at http://algonquincollege.com/byod

(Please note this was previously referred to as a Mobile Learning Program)

Another Mobile Device ImageeTextbooks: As a student in a program that has adopted etextbooks, your required texts and digital resources will be provided to you at the beginning of each term (with the exception of general education electives). For more information and associated fees, go to http://www.algonquincollege.com/etextbooks/

Related Programs:
Library and Information Technician (Online Learning, Part Time On Campus)

Ontario College Diploma
2 Year(s)

Program Code: 0440X01FWO
Academic Year: 2016/2017



Our Program

This two-year Ontario College Diploma program provides students with the knowledge and skills required to carry out the tasks performed in two main functional areas of library and information resource centres: technical services and public services. Technical services involve manual and automated operations related to acquiring, processing and organizing all types of informational material. Public services involve assisting or teaching clients in finding, or using information resources, in print and in electronic format.

Students test their knowledge and skills through field placements in school, public, government and academic libraries, archives, records or information management organizations.

Bring Your Own Device (BYOD): Students are expected to have and use a laptop or mobile computing device when registered in this on-campus program. Hardware and software specifications required by your program are outlined at http://algonquincollege.com/byod. Mobile devices/laptops and supplies can be purchased directly from Algonquin`s New Technology Store at educational rates.

SUCCESS FACTORS


This program is well-suited for students who:
  • Enjoy serving the public, working with teams and have good interpersonal skills.
  • Have strong English communication skills, verbal and written.
  • Possess a good general education and knowledge of current events.
  • Are well-organized and have the ability to analyze information.
  • Pay attention to detail and work with a high degree of accuracy.
  • Are flexible, adaptable, self-motivated and work well independently.

 

Your Career

Graduates may secure employment as library technicians in, information centres, archives or in the field of records and information management. Employers range from school boards, universities, colleges, federal government departments, public libraries, non-profit organizations, law firms, hospitals and businesses. Duties may be limited to specific areas of technical or public service, or may cover the whole range of library activities, depending on the size of the library or information centre. A growing area of employment opportunity is in the information management field.

Learning Outcomes

The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to:
  1. Acquire, loan, borrow, and maintain book, serial and online collections, using procedures for bibliographic verification, vendor selection, order production, and fund management.
  2. Derive, edit and/or create catalogue records using internationally accepted cataloguing rules with MARC coding in national bibliographic utilities, and computer-based systems.
  3. Conduct reference interviews, analyze information requests in a variety of topic areas, provide instructional assistance, and perform searches using current, relevant and authoritative resources.
  4. Assess client needs and provide effective client service to distinct client groups in various library, archive or information management settings.
  5. Develop and prepare promotional materials, library programming, bibliographies, finding tools and reports using word processing and publishing programs.
  6. Design relational databases, web sites and use integrated library systems and other library related software according to current standards.
  7. Identify different types of libraries and topics related to library science such as the publishing industry, freedom of information, censorship and copyright.
  8. Recognize, identify and perform duties in an archive, records management or information management setting and apply meta data to online resources.
  9. Outline theories and practice of library management and apply skills in staff supervision, conducting primary research, marketing library services and budget preparation.
  10. Identify and apply discipline-specific practices that contribute to the local and global community through social responsibility, economic commitment and environmental stewardship.
    1. Courses

      Programs at Algonquin College are delivered using a variety of instruction modes. Courses may be offered in the classroom or lab, entirely online, or in a hybrid mode which combines classroom sessions with online learning activities. Upon registration, each full-time student is provided an Algonquin email account which is used to communicate important information about program or course events.
      Level: 01 Hours
      ENL1813S Communications I Communication remains an essential skill sought by employers, regardless of discipline or field of study. Using a practical, vocation-oriented approach, students focus on meeting the requirements of effective communication. Students practice writing, speaking, reading, listening, locating and documenting information, and using technology to communicate professionally. Students develop and strengthen communication skills that contribute to success in both educational and workplace environments. 45.0
      LIB2001 Descriptive Cataloguing I The catalogue is the main finding aid to the collection of the library. Students learn the basic principles and concepts of international standards used to describe library materials. Students apply these cataloguing standards. Focus is on original cataloguing of monographic literature. 45.0
      LIB2002 Reference I Learning to find information and support clients on how to use the library are important skills for library work. Students develop skills in communicating with clients, providing research support, finding and evaluating information in a variety of print and online sources. In addition, students practise procedures and follow policies used in library reference departments to manage requests and handle challenging situations. 45.0
      LIB2003 Introduction to Libraries Students learn about the different kinds of libraries, their departments and the services they offer their clientele. Of particular emphasis are the programs and services provided by libraries. Students explore different fundamental topics within library work, such as literacy, censorship, copyright, and freedom of information. Included are visits to local library settings which complement the learning. 45.0
      LIB2025 Acquisitions A library depends upon effective ordering of books, magazines and electronic resources to serve their clientele. Students practise procedures for selecting, ordering and receiving library materials. In addition, students learn how to follow record keeping procedures, choose appropriate vendors, maintain accounts and handle receipt and payment discrepancies. 45.0
      LIB2026 Archives and Records Management Students can find employment in a variety of information related fields, such as archives, records and information management departments. Students learn the principles and methods used by archivists, record and information managers in organizing their collections for better access and retrieval. Skills such as the preservation of records, development of an essential records program, disaster contingency planning, research and reference services, marketing and public programming and basic management practices are covered. 45.0
      Elective: choose 1 Hours
      FLS3000 French as a Second Language Beginner I Learning French is essential to understand and communicate in workplace environments. Students develop basic level abilities in reading, listening and speaking through active participation in a wide range of communication activities. Through the acquisition of basic French grammar, students give and receive personal and work-related information, describe surrounding objects and people by using very simple sentences and by asking and giving directions. Active participation in-class is required. 48.0
      FLS3001 French as a Second Language Beginner II Success in bilingual postsecondary institutions and in the workplace rests upon good French language skills. Students increase reading, listening and speaking skills while using their program-related basic vocabulary to enhance their understanding of workplace French as they complete a wide range of assignments. Students explore sentence structure and grammar in order to write simple sentences, describe daily tasks in the present tense and explain their plans using the near future tense. Active participation in class is required. 48.0
      Level: 02 Hours
      ENL0051 Readers' Advisory Services: Children and Youth Literacy is an essential life-long skill that school and public libraries are uniquely positioned to help children and youth develop. Using a life-stage approach, students familiarize themselves with a broad range of books and other library material that they can promote to their future patrons while utilizing their knowledge of child and teen literacy development. In addition, students create, market and deliver library programs targeting various age groups. Learning how to place the right books in the right hands at the right moment ensures students become valuable and contributing members of their community.

      Prerequisites: ENL1813S
      45.0
      LIB2020 Client Services Providing excellent customer service is an important aspect of library or information work. Students learn effective methods for helping clients at various service points, including circulation, information and outreach services. Case studies, in-class discussion and learning activities focus on meeting the needs of library users. In addition, students are introduced to the importance of adhering to provincial and/or municipal regulated accessibility legislation. Finally, students learn current practices in the profession from guest speakers. 45.0
      LIB2021 Descriptive Cataloguing II Library collections hold a variety of materials in addition to publications in print. Students learn how to apply the basic cataloguing principles and concepts to different physical formats, such as maps, graphics, music and film.

      Prerequisites: LIB2001
      45.0
      LIB2022 Subject Analysis and Indexing The catalogue provides access to the collection of a library by assigning subject headings to each of the cataloguing records. Students learn the theory of subject analysis developed by the professional community and how to use some of the more common subject heading lists found in Canadian libraries. 45.0
      LIB2023 Information Retrieval Clients require up-to-date, reliable and often scholarly information, which can be found in online databases. Students learn how to best search these databases, and to teach clients how to use them. Students learn techniques for finding the best information, quickly and effectively. In addition, students learn policies and procedures for lending and borrowing material from other libraries and copyright implications of handling electronic documents.

      Prerequisites: LIB2002
      45.0
      LIB2024 Internet Applications Libraries rely on Internet tools and resources to provide service to their clients and to communicate with their clients. Students learn about effective internet research strategies, innovative social media tools and learn how to create a website. Students develop web pages using the latest standards for accessible web design. 45.0
      Elective: choose 1 Hours
      FLS3001 French as a Second Language Beginner II Success in bilingual postsecondary institutions and in the workplace rests upon good French language skills. Students increase reading, listening and speaking skills while using their program-related basic vocabulary to enhance their understanding of workplace French as they complete a wide range of assignments. Students explore sentence structure and grammar in order to write simple sentences, describe daily tasks in the present tense and explain their plans using the near future tense. Active participation in class is required. 48.0
      FLS3002 French as a Second Language Beginner III Clear and accurate communication skills in French lead to academic and career success. Students receive extensive feedback from instructors to improve comprehension and develop strategies for effective communication in the workplace and in postsecondary environments. Students communicate basic personal information using common and familiar words, as well as formulaic expressions, in response to simple questions about immediate needs, such as greetings and other goodwill messages. They read and understand short adapted texts using everyday vocabulary. Active participation in class is required. 48.0
      Choose one from equivalencies: Hours
      GED0440 General Education Elective Students choose one course, from a group of general education electives, which meets one of the following five theme requirements: Arts in Society, Civic Life, Social and Cultural Understanding, Personal Understanding, and Science and Technology.

      Equivalencies: ARC9001 or DSN2001 or FAM1218 or FIN2300 or GED5200 or GED5300 or GEN1001 or GEN1957 or GEN2000 or GEN2003 or GEN2007 or HIS0001 or HIS2000 or HOS2228 or LIB1982 or MGT7330 or MVM8800 or RAD2001 or SOC2003 or GED5002 or GED5004 or GED5005 or GED5006 or GED6022 or GED1896 or GED5009 or PSI0003
      45.0
      Level: 03 Hours
      ENL0069 Professional Communication for Library Technicians Communicating clearly to different audiences for different purposes is a skill required for success in the workplace. Students refine writing, speaking, reading, listening, research and oral presentation skills for the cultural sector. Students learn to compose and format standard business correspondence, reports, proposals, flyers and brochures. 45.0
      LIB2031 Descriptive Cataloguing III The catalogue provides access to online electronic resources, as well as the physical collection of the library. Students learn how to catalogue electronic resources using international standards from the library and internet communities. Practical skills are acquired.

      Prerequisites: LIB2001
      36.0
      LIB2032 Dewey Decimal Classification Classification provides access to the collection of the library through shelving the physical material by subject as indicated by the call number of the individual item. Students learn the theoretical framework used by the Dewey Decimal Classification scheme. Emphasis is on how to apply the scheme. Students acquire practical skills in how to classify library materials. 36.0
      LIB2033 Reference II: Special Topics Learning to find information and support clients on how to use the library are important skills for library workers. Students build on their skills in researching information and providing service to clients, with a focus on specialized topics. Through working with print and electronic resources, students practise answering questions in the areas of business, law and government information. In addition, students develop subject specific guides to information for clients, and document information about changes to Canadian legislation.

      Prerequisites: LIB2002
      36.0
      LIB2034 Emerging Library Technologies Libraries use a variety of technology to retrieve, manage and organize digital content for their clients. Students learn about the latest trends in library-related and other information tools. In addition, students assess and gain practical experience with various software, web and mobile tools.

      Prerequisites: LIB2023
      36.0
      LIB2035 Basics of Library Management Libraries are organizations that require management of their staff and resources. Students learn about planning, supervising people, employment laws and budgeting. Students practise skills in managing library resources and staff. 36.0
      Electives: 1 with Departmental Approval Hours
      LIB2030 Field Work I Employers look for library and information technicians who have relevant work experience and can apply their learning to the workplace. Through integrating with the ongoing work or projects of a supervising library or information management centre, students adapt and apply what they have learned to the workplace, over a full-time three week placement. The field placement coordinator arranges student placements and works with employers to arrange work requirements and schedules.

      Prerequisites: LIB2001 or LIB2002 or LIB2003 or LIB2004 or LIB2021 or LIB2025 or ENL1813S
      108.0
      LIB2038 Directed Research Seminar Libraries often use surveys, focus groups or other research methodologies to determine how well they are performing and serving their clients. Through a small research project, led by faculty members, students learn research methodology and engage in a variety of activities, such as writing research proposals, conducting surveys, analyzing results and writing reports. Course activities vary depending on the nature of the research project. 108.0
      Choose one from equivalencies: Hours
      GED0440 General Education Elective Students choose one course, from a group of general education electives, which meets one of the following five theme requirements: Arts in Society, Civic Life, Social and Cultural Understanding, Personal Understanding, and Science and Technology.

      Equivalencies: ARC9001 or DSN2001 or FAM1218 or FIN2300 or GED5200 or GED5300 or GEN1001 or GEN1957 or GEN2000 or GEN2003 or GEN2007 or HIS0001 or HIS2000 or HOS2228 or LIB1982 or MGT7330 or MVM8800 or RAD2001 or SOC2003 or GED5002 or GED5004 or GED5005 or GED5006 or GED6022 or GED1896 or GED5009 or PSI0003
      45.0
      Level: 04 Hours
      ENL0053 Readers' Advisory Services: Adults Knowing the characteristics of literature/film genres is required for those employed in libraries. Students become familiar with and learn how to market fiction and non-fiction library materials available to adults. Students further develop their communication skills through writing, speaking, reading, listening, research and oral presentation activities and assignments.

      Prerequisites: ENL1813S
      36.0
      LIB2041 Special Collections Understanding the history of the book trade gives students a great appreciation of our cultural heritage. Students learn about aspects of physical bibliography, the book trade, preservation and conservation of books, as well as how to exhibit such material. Students develop an understanding on the history of the book and conservation of historical material. 36.0
      LIB2042 Library of Congress Classification Classification provides access to the collection of the library through shelving the physical material by subject as indicated by the call number of the individual item. Students learn the theoretical framework used by the Library of Congress Classification scheme. Emphasis is on how to apply the scheme. Students acquire practical skills in how to classify library materials. 36.0
      LIB2043 Reference III: Science and Technology Libraries provide support to many different subject areas, including science, medicine and technology. Students learn the different print and online resources, and different client service requirements in scientific or medical libraries, to assist clients with finding accurate, current and good quality materials. Students practise teaching clients how to use reference resources in real-life scenarios.

      Prerequisites: LIB2002
      36.0
      LIB2044 Marketing Libraries and information centres need to market their services and demonstrate their value, to their customers and to their funders, in order to survive and grow. Students apply marketing theory and techniques to develop a marketing plan. Students gain experience in marketing a product or service of a library or information centre. 36.0
      LIB2045 Library Software Libraries rely on a computerized library system to handle the operations in a library, including cataloguing, checking books in and out and handling the book ordering. Students gain hands-on practice using a library system. Students also learn about additional software, such as productivity, collaboration and client engagement tools. 36.0
      LIB2047 Field Work II Students practise their skills in a workplace. Students are provided with the opportunity to experience a different type of library or information management centre, and to apply a different skill set to that workplace.

      Prerequisites: LIB2030
      108.0

      Fees & Expenses   

      2016/2017 Academic Year

      Total Fees for the first year of the program:

      Domestic tuition/ancillary fees: $5,165.30. *

      International tuition/ancillary Fees: $14,691.34. *

      * Amounts include tuition fee, program specific lab and material fees, applicable eText fees, Students` Association fees and compulsory ancillary fees. Fees are subject to change. For detailed fees information please visit http://www.algonquincollege.com/ro/pay/tuition-and-expenses

      Note: For further information regarding your books, please visit
      http://www.algonquincollege.com/etexts

      Books and supplies cost approximately $1,000 for the first year and $200 for the second year. Supplies can be purchased at the campus store. See
      www3.algonquincollege.com/etextbooks for more information about books.

      Admission Requirements   

      2017/2018 Academic Year

      College Eligibility
      • Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent. Applicants with an OSSD showing senior English and/or Mathematics courses at the Basic Level, or with Workplace or Open courses, will be tested to determine their eligibility for admission; OR
      • Academic and Career Entrance (ACE) certificate; OR
      • General Educational Development (GED) certificate; OR
      • Mature Student status (19 years of age or older and without a high school diploma at the start of the program). Eligibility may be determined by academic achievement testing for which a fee of $50 (subject to change) will be charged.
      Program Eligibility
      • English, Grade 12 (ENG4C or equivalent) with a grade of 65% or higher.
      • Applicants with International transcripts must provide proof of the subject specific requirements noted above along with proof of either:
        IELTS-International English Language Testing Service-Overall band of 6.5 with a minimum of 6.0 in each band.
        OR
        TOEFL-Internet-based (iBT)-overall 88, with the minimum of 22 in each component: Reading 22; Listening: 22 Speaking: 22, Writing: 22

      Word processing and Windows Operating System skills are recommended prior to beginning the program.

      Should the number of qualified applicants exceed the number of available places, applicants will be selected on the basis of their proficiency in English.

      Police Records Check Documentation

      Though not an admission requirement, applicants must note important information listed below regarding Police Records Check program requirements.

      Students must provide the College with a current Police Records Check for Service with the Vulnerable Sector (PRCSVS) prior to the deadline identified by the department and students are responsible for any associated costs. If this documentation is not submitted on time, students may not be placed and registration in the program will be jeopardized. If you register in the program without a clear PRCSVS and as a result are unable to participate in placement, you will not be able to graduate and will be asked to withdraw.

      Field Placement Eligibility:

      To be eligible for placement in your second year, you must submit proof of a PRCSVS, which will be retained on your departmental file and used only for purposes related to your placement. You will be required to disclose the contents of the PRCSVS, including all notations, to the placement agencies.

      It is your responsibility to obtain the PRCSVS from your local Police Department prior to the deadline identified by your Department and to pay any associated costs. It may take a long time to obtain this documentation; please submit your application as early as possible. Should you require further information, contact the Program Coordinator.

      Application Information

      LIBRARY AND INFORMATION TECHNICIAN Program Code 0440X01FWO
      Applications to full-time day programs must be submitted with official transcripts showing completion of the academic admission requirements through:

      ontariocolleges.ca
      60 Corporate Court
      Guelph, Ontario
      N1G 5J3
      1-888-892-2228

      Students currently enrolled in an Ontario secondary school should notify their Guidance Office prior to their online application at www.ontariocolleges.ca
      Applications for Fall Term and Winter Term admission received by February 1 will be given equal consideration. Applications received after February 1 will be processed on a first-come, first-served basis as long as places are available.

      International applicants applying from out-of-country can obtain the
      International Student Application Form at
      https://algonquincollege.force.com/myACint/ or by contacting the Registrar`s Office.

      For further information on the admissions process, contact:

      Registrar`s Office
      Algonquin College
      1385 Woodroffe Ave, Room C150
      Ottawa, ON K2G 1V8
      Telephone: 613-727-0002
      Toll-free: 1-800-565-4723
      TTY: 613-727-7766
      Fax: 613-727-7632
      Email: AskUs@algonquincollege.com

      Additional Information

      The Library and Information Technician program consists of courses that are delivered in a variety of formats including face-to-face in a classroom, hybrid (combination of classroom and online learning) and fully online.

      Class schedules vary from semester to semester and courses may be scheduled between the hours of 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. Students participate in all three types of learning.

      Students are strongly encouraged to improve their French language skills to maximize job opportunities, particularly those available in the Ottawa area which require bilingualism. Students are tested in the first week of classes and placed in the French course appropriate to their level. Students exceeding the program levels are granted exemptions as appropriate.

      Students may apply for transfer of academic credits from Algonquin College (internal transfer) or from other institutions (external transfer). College Policies AA09 and AA10 apply to transfer of credits. For more information visit: www.algonquincollege.com/directives. Students may apply for credit by challenging courses using Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR). College Policy AA06 applies to PLAR. Students pay a fee for each course they wish to be exempt from and, through either a portfolio or challenge examination, a PLAR may lead to the acceptance of work and life experience in lieu of taking certain courses. For more information visit:
      www.algonquincollege.com/col/plar.html.

      Library and information technicians are often in contact with the public and frequently engage with others in a team environment. As such, interpersonal skills and the ability to communicate effectively both verbally and in writing are considered crucial skills for our graduates.

      This program is also offered through the Centre for Continuing and Online Learning on a part-time basis in the evenings.

      ACADEMIC PROBATION

      Students who have two or more F grades in a given term or whose term grade point average falls below 1.7 are considered to be on academic probation (Policy AA14 Grading System). This requires the student to meet with their academic advisor or coordinator to sign a learning contract which identifies the conditions which must be met to continue in the program. Students who do not meet the terms of their learning contract are withdrawn from the program.

      For program information, contact the Program Coordinator, Helena Merriam at 613-727-4723 ext. 5338.

      Every attempt is made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this publication. The College reserves the right to modify or cancel any course, program, fee, timetable, or campus location at any time