ARC9001: Conserving Canada's Architectural Heritage

If your field is architecture, building trades, engineering, social planning or tourism, your future is certain to include the past. To Canadians, preserving our heritage resources is a visible sign of community pride and environmental responsibility. Protecting heritage buildings requires an understanding of their histories and the principles of conservation shared by the preservation community. Students acquaint themselves with a variety of building styles and traditional building techniques as they have evolved across the Canadian landscape.

Theme 3: Social and Cultural Understanding

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DSN2001: History of Design

Visual communications and graphic design have played a key role in the evolution of communication through a number of historical and social art movements. Graphic design has had a major impact on civilizations over the ages. Students explore graphic design's many influences, including the invention of writing and alphabets, the origins of printing and typography, Victorian, Art Nouveau, Modern Art, and PostModern design, to the present day computer revolution and its influence on the many forms of contemporary visual communication that surround us every day.

Theme 1: Arts in Society

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ENL1725: Popular Canadian Literature

Canadian identity is challenging to define, but depictions of our multicultural society are found and explored in our literature. This course introduces students to a wide range of literature with the dual aim of exploring the theme of the Canadian identity while enhancing students' cultural and self-awareness. The course explores the importance of writers' perceptions of the world, and how those perceptions affect contemporary Canadian society. Through assigned readings, discussion, presentations and essay writing, students investigate the role of the artist in defining and shaping society.

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ENL1726: Artistic Expression: A Canadian Exploration

From drawings on cave walls to masterpieces painted on church ceilings, humans have expressed themselves through paintings, sculpture, graffiti, installation art, and even body modification. In this interactive, discussion-based course, students analyze and critique art in the context of both theoretical principles and historical influences. Through an examination of past and present forms of traditional and non-traditional art, students align individual perceptions with artistic works and consider the value of cultural and ethical boundaries on expression. To complete their experience, students create and annotate an outlet for their own artistic expression, using a medium of their choice.

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ENL1798: Contemporary Canadian Issues

A critical understanding of contemporary Canadian issues is essential to being an active member in our democratic society. Students explore a variety of topics and analyze their ethical implications and relevance to Canadian life. Discussions and debates, as well as related interactive activities, offer opportunities to consider recent controversies from different perspectives. Use of a variety of media (e.g. newspapers, articles and electronic resources) allows for in-depth reflection on the history of current social and political issues.

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ENL1825: Communication Dynamics

Social psychology involves the study of individuals, groups, or organizations and their interpersonal or impersonal connections with others. Participants in this course explore notions of self-concept, as well as human behaviour such as conformity, obedience and aggression. Special attention is paid to current events in order to explore personal growth within a variety of contexts. Case studies allow students to reflect and build upon their own experiences.

Prerequisite(s): ENL1813B and ENL1823B (or) ENL1813B and ENL1962

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ENL1829: The Art of Oratory

From ghost stories around the campfire to political speeches by world leaders, oratory plays a significant role in human interaction. Participants examine the social significance of public speaking, including theoretical, psychological and physiological aspects of this art. Participants prepare and take part in workshops, as well as critique and deliver oral presentations, as they tell their own stories.

Prerequisite(s): ENL1813B and ENL1823B (or) ENL1813B and ENL1962.

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Technical Communication Students develop technical communication skills. Topics include written and oral reports; technical writing style; employment correspondence and resumes; locating, evaluating and documenting technical information; interpreting and using visuals; and other communication skills required by technicians in today's workplace. Prerequisites: ENL7777 Download Course Outline

ENV0002: Environmental Citizenship

Based on the general principles of national citizenship, environmental citizenship goes beyond national borders to emphasize global environmental rights and responsibilities. Focus is on both conservation and planned sustainable use of our planet's resources, as well as the recognition that environmental health is a prerequisite to human health. Being an environmentally-aware citizen involves a personal commitment to learning more about the environment and to taking responsible environmental action. Students are encouraged to adopt attitudes and behaviours that foster global environmental responsibility.

Theme 2: Civic Life

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FAM1218: A Cultural Diversity Quest

Learners explore the concept of multiculturalism and some of the ways in which it is interpreted by Canadian society. Through an online quest, learners expand their knowledge of Canada's various cultural groups and examine the issue of ethnocentricity and analyze factors that lead to prejudice, racism, and discrimination in Canadian society. Finally, learners seek out ways to appreciate cultural differences and promote positive intercultural relationships in their communities and in their workplaces.

Theme 3: Social and Cultural Understanding

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FIN2300: Introduction to Personal Finance

Establishing and maintaining healthy personal financial affairs are important steps towards overall success in life. Through self-study of text material, review questions, self-test quizzes, assignments and a final examination, students acquire knowledge and skills concerning credit and debt, home ownership and mortgages, the savings challenge, government programs to encourage saving, fixed income and equity investments, mutual funds, budgeting and financial planning, retirement strategies, public and private pensions, business ownership and insurance.

Theme 4: Personal Understanding

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Theme 1: Arts in Society

Rationale: Your capacity to recognize and evaluate artistic and creative achievements is useful in many aspects of life. Since artistic expression is a fundamental human activity that both reflects and anticipates developments in culture at large, its study enhances your cultural understanding and self-awareness.

Content: Courses in this theme group lead to an understanding of the importance of visual and creative arts in human affairs, of artists’ and writers’ perceptions of the world, and the means by which those perceptions are translated into visual, auditory, performance, literary, and other art forms. They also provide an appreciation of the aesthetic values used in examining works of art and possibly a direct experience in expressing perceptions artistically. The following Objectives define the general learning outcomes of courses in the Arts in Society General Education Theme:

Theme Objectives:

Art Itself

  1. Explore artists’ and writers’ perceptions of the world.
  2. Discuss the aesthetic values used in examining works of art.
  3. Evaluate artistic and creative achievements.

Social Context

  1. Explain how artistic expression is a fundamental human activity.
  2. Describe how art both reflects and anticipates developments in culture at large.
  3. Evaluate the importance of visual and creative arts in human affairs.

Meaning

  1. Explain how art produces meaning and affects audiences.
  2. Analyse how artistic perceptions of the world and human affairs are translated into artistic expression in various media.
  3. Evaluate art in relation to personal and cultural self-awareness.

Creation

  1. Express personal perceptions in an artistic medium

Theme 2: Civic Life

Rationale: For people to live responsibly and reach their potential as individuals and citizens in society, they must understand the human relationship patterns that underlie orderly conduct within that society’s various structural units. Informed people must understand the meaning of civic life in relation to diverse communities at the local, national, and global level, and be aware of international issues and their effects on Canada and its place in the international community.

Content: Courses in this area provide students with an understanding of the meaning of rights, freedoms, and participation in community and public life, in addition to a working knowledge of the structure and function of various levels of government in Canada and/or in an international context. They may also provide an historical understanding of major political issues affecting relations between these various levels and their constituents. The following Objectives define the general learning outcomes of courses in the Civic Life General Education Theme:

Theme Objectives:

One Human to Another

  1. Discuss what it means for people to live responsibly and reach their potential as individuals and citizens in society.
  2. Examine human relationship patterns that underlie the orderly interactions within society’s various structural units.

The Group

  1. Explain the meaning of rights, freedoms, and participation in community and public life.
  2. Summarize the function of various levels of government (municipal, provincial, national) in Canada and/or in an international context.
  3. Analyze the historical underpinnings of major political issues affecting relations between the various levels of government and their constituents in Canada.

Wider Context

  1. Compare civic life across diverse communities at the local, national, and global level.
  2. Discuss Canada’s place in the international community.
  3. Analyze international issues and their effects on Canada.

Theme 3: Social and Cultural Understanding

Rationale: Knowing the patterns and precedents of the past provides the means by which people may develop awareness of their place in contemporary culture and society. Such knowledge also helps frame an understanding of the main currents of one’s own culture and that of others across time in order to place one’s personal experience in the collective that constitutes culture at large.

Content: Courses in this area deal broadly with major social and cultural themes that define people and events historically and geographically. Many focus on the various ways that historical and contemporary events may be interpreted through available evidence. Students thus develop an appreciation for and understanding of the impact of socio-cultural, ethnic, and religious forces on individuals and groups. The following Objectives define the general learning outcomes of courses in the Social and Cultural Understanding General Education Theme:

Theme Objectives:

Past and Present—Here, There, and Everywhere

  1. Identify the patterns and precedents of the past that provide the means by which people may develop awareness of their place in contemporary culture and society.
  2. Examine the main currents of one’s own culture and that of others across time in order to place one’s personal experience in culture at large.
  3. Outline the major social and cultural themes that define people and events historically and geographically.

Making Sense of It All

  1. Analyze the various ways that historical and contemporary events may be interpreted through available evidence.
  2. Evaluate the impact of socio-cultural, economic, ethical, ethnic, and/or religious forces on groups, individuals, and yourself.

Theme 4: Personal Understanding

Rationale: Becoming the fully functional, integrated persons necessary to achieve vocational and financial success requires due attention to our physical, mental, emotional, social, sexual, and spiritual health. The long road to personhood can be a bumpy one without roadmaps through the various social systems and institutions that take us safely from early adulthood to retirement.

Content: Courses in this area focus on understanding one’s personal development, economic function, social life, place in the environment and universe, challenges and opportunities, setbacks and success, and meaning and purpose. Courses facilitating the study of human social behaviour systematically allow students to understand how individuals can function and succeed in a variety of contexts. The following Objectives define the general learning outcomes of courses in the Personal Understanding General Education Theme:

Theme Objectives:

Placing Ourselves

  1. Explore individual development, economic function, social life, place in the environment and universe, challenges and opportunities, setbacks and success, and meaning and purpose.
  2. Consider human social behaviour systematically.
  3. Explain how individuals may navigate various social systems and institutions to become integrated physiological and psychological entities.

Finding Our Potential Selves

  1. Compare individual functioning and success in a variety of institutional contexts (e.g., educational, vocational, commercial, recreational, nuptial, familial, etc.).
  2. Analyze the ideal of being fully functioning persons vocationally, physically, mentally, emotionally, socially, sexually, and spiritually.

Theme 5: Science and Technology

Content: Courses in this area range in focus from the basics of the scientific method to the diverse technological applications that have changed—and will continue to change—our lives for better and worse. While students may develop a wary eye for the dangers of technological excess and encroachment into every aspect of our collective being, they also explore ways that new technology can be used to right the wrongs of old technology, especially with regard to the environment. Other technologies explored may also bring us to a deeper understanding of ourselves and our place in the environment and universe. The following Objectives define the general learning outcomes of courses in the Science and Technology General Education Theme:

Theme Objectives:

Scientific Foundations

  1. Explore the nature of matter, energy, and related universal concepts in science.
  2. Consider the nature and interactions of living and non-living systems in the universe.
  3. Illustrate the relationships between basic areas of science such as chemistry, physics, astronomy, geology, and biology, as well as mathematics and the social sciences.
  4. Apply the scientific method to conduct basic scientific inquiry.
  5. Discuss the impact of science in a world that still clings to traditions and superstitions.

Technological Advancement

  1. Discuss the role of technological innovation in a world imperiled by previous technologies.
  2. Evaluate the increasing impact of technology on all aspects of human endeavour.
  3. Analyze the myriad psychosocial, economic, and philosophical implications of technology.

GED1896: The Middle East: An Understanding of Media Sources & Their Impact

We live in an age in which influential messages about pressing events and social issues are delivered through mass media. Therefore, it is essential that people consciously analyze and evaluate media messages when interpreting history and current events. Students seek out current, accurate and credible sources of information and examine the influence that media messages have on their understanding of the world. Through the analysis of readings and audio and video materials, students develop critical-thinking skills while gaining an understanding of historical and current events in the Middle East.

Theme 3: Social and Cultural Understanding

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GED5002: Victimology

An increased awareness of the ripple effect of crime has given rise to victimology as a significant field of study. Students investigate victims of crime and the impact that crime has on their lives, their families and society by studying the history of victimology and the victims' movement, the nature and extent of victimization, its emerging theories and resulting legislation. In addition victims' services, accessibility to services, rights of the victim and the victim in the criminal justice system are examined. Students also learn about crime in the workplace, schools, and campuses and the importance of recognizing those at risk.

Theme 2: Civic Life

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GED5003: The Science of Play

Toys and games, key components of play, have evolved from homemade trinkets to highly engineered items in a multi-billion-dollar industry.  Students explore the connections between technology and play, specifically the benefits, drawbacks and ethical implications of toy and game design. Case studies allow students to consider familial, cultural, sociological, and other influences upon toy and game design over the last century. Through discussion, analysis and workshops, students move towards designing their own toy or game, or modifying an existing one.

Theme 5: Science and Technology

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GED5004: Living Green

The need to lead healthy, environmentally conscious lives is increasingly important. Students acquire the practical knowledge and skills required to explore current environmental challenges and identify personal plans for living in an environmentally responsible manner. Students investigate the history and development of current environmental concerns, the environmental impact of our choices and behaviours, and the strategies involved in living green.

Theme 5: Science & Technology

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GED5005: Greek Mythology

Students explore intriguing characters, important places and famous myths of Classical Greece. By examining a variety of popular myths, students discover how the Ancient Greeks crafted narratives of gods, goddesses, monsters, and heroic figures to make sense of their lives and the world around them. Using examples from art, science, and industry, students examine how these epic stories from oral tradition have endured and continue to influence contemporary society.

Theme 1: Arts in Society

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GED5006: World Religions

In Canada, society embraces people from many cultures of the world. By exploring different religious beliefs about the world, the individual, the meaning of life and death, and how individuals are encouraged to conduct themselves, students begin to appreciate the underlying forces that shape followers' lives. Students explore the history and basic teachings of six of the major religions of the world: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and the Baha'i Faith. Each religion's distinctive features are highlighted, while their similarities and shared values are examined. Students have the opportunity to broaden their worldview through an exposure to divergent religious traditions.

Theme 3: Social & Cultural Understanding

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GED5009: Digging into Ancestral Roots

Students are encouraged to become amateur genealogists, recording their past for future generations using the modern tools of science and technology. Students examine how scientists use DNA evidence to trace one's origins back to the beginning of humankind's existence, and to determine how contemporary individuals might be related to one another. By examining microfilm technology and computer databases that store and retrieve data about their ancestors, students uncover data, such as birth, death, marriage records and land transactions. Through discussion forum activities and individual research, students retrieve family records and examine privacy issues associated with putting one's family tree online. The final product is a four-generational family tree supported by genealogical evidence.

Theme 5: Science and Technology

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GED5200: Learning Disabilities: The Invisible Disability

Students increase their awareness of, and sensitivity to, persons with learning disabilities in social, educational and work settings. The field of learning disabilities is introduced through an historical overview, definitions, characteristics, and various models of the causes of learning disabilities. Students learn about the impact learning disabilities have on people's day-to-day lives and the strategies that may be used to compensate for them. Activities include group work, independent research, reflection and case studies. Students are encouraged to share personal experience and knowledge.

Theme 4: Personal Understanding

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GED5300: The Science of Everyday Life

The mysteries of science surround us constantly and play a significant role in everyone's daily life regardless of their level of awareness. Familiarity with the basic concepts of science in disciplines, such as biology, physics, and chemistry, helps students better understand the world in which they live, the attitudes and opinions of those with whom they interact, and the reasons why many things happen. By examining everyday occurrences, students are introduced to scientific ways of thought and to problem-solving methods used by scientists. A background in science and math is not required.

Theme 5: Science and Technology

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GED6022: A Sense of Humour

Humour is a universal tool of communication and social influence. Students survey the development, use and value of humour in Canadian visual and creative arts. Varieties of humour, such as irony, satire and farce, are positioned in the context of Canadian culture to enhance the student’s appreciation of humour and self-awareness.

Theme 1: Arts in Society

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GEN1001: Ethics: What’s the Big Deal?

In today’s society there is increasingly more attention focused on questions of right or wrong, good or evil. Ethical issues relating to a wide variety of concerns are examined. Students clarify their own moral values and explore how these values impact the course of their lives. Students practise using tools and decision-making models to deal with personal and professional dilemmas.

Theme 4: Personal Understanding

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GEN1957: Science Fiction

Science fiction is both a genre of popular entertainment and a mode of social commentary. Students explore the formal conventions and the history of the genre, consume and analyze a representative range of science fiction, and strive to heighten their critical appreciation of the role and place of science fiction in society. Students also have an opportunity to create their own piece of science fiction.

Theme 1: Arts in Society

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GEN2000: Multiculturalism in Film

Official policy in Canada since 1971, multiculturalism remains controversial in many sectors of Canadian life. Through viewing and reflecting on a series of films, learners enhance their understanding of multiculturalism, as well as the values and representations of multiculturalism, both positive and negative, that the films present. Among the issues covered are immigration, refugees, ethnic enclaves, the "Quebec question", indigenous relations, racism and ethnic violence.

Theme 3: Social and Cultural Understanding

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GEN2003: Healthy Lifestyle

Are you eating healthy foods? Do you exercise regularly? Do you know how to prevent injuries and disease? These are some of the skills necessary to live a healthy lifestyle. Through self-evaluation, weekly journals, and hands-on exercises students asses their personal lifestyles and learn how to improve them.

Theme 4: Personal Understanding

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GEN2007: Community Service

Volunteerism not only benefits a community, it can broaden the worldview of the volunteer. Students who give their time and energy to a particular cause, gain an opportunity to reflect on the value of the volunteer in contemporary society. Through research and discussion, students consider different types of volunteer settings, trace the history of volunteer organizations, examine the various roles volunteers play within society, and reflect on ethical issues.

Theme 2: Civic Life

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GEN2009 Geology of the Ottawa Area

This general education course leads students back through the record of time. Moving first by centuries, then millennia, taking time in ever increasing bites until the origin of the planet is discussed. A digital photo library explores local sites of interest which reveal the principles of geology. The building blocks of rocks, from minerals to atoms, are explained with a minimum of jargon using only the key words necessary to unlock the world of science. Students develop the ability to appreciate the genesis of mountains, and speculate intelligently on the age and mineralogy of a pebble from their shoe. The dynamics of the ever-shifting continents and their impact upon the Ottawa area are explored.

Theme 5: Science and Technology

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HIS0001: Saints and Heroes: Shining a Spotlight on the ‘Dark Ages,’ Europe A.D. 410-1096

When the mighty Roman Empire began to collapse, it was attacked from all directions by Barbarian armies. The resulting turmoil caused Europe to sink into a period of social and political upheaval known as The Dark Ages. However, during these troubled times, extraordinary warriors and missionaries emerged whose profound influence has played a vital role in shaping what has become our modern world. Students examine the social, political, intellectual, and economic history of this era and explore its enduring impact on modern western society.

Theme 3: Social and Cultural Understanding

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HIS2000: Good Times and Bad - 70 Years in the Life of Canada

During the 70 years from 1897 to 1967, Canadians experienced times of prosperity and progress, as well as periods of depression and war. There were times of optimism and moments of crisis. Through it all Canadians built a nation and contributed to the world's development. Students explore the political framework of Canada, recurring social issues, and the place of Canada in the world.

Theme 2: Civic Life

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Personal Health and Wellness Students are introduced to a broad range of topics, issues, and information as they explore personal health and wellness. The importance of knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour are emphasized as students reflect on their current lifestyle practices and explore models of behaviour change to implement strategies and techniques promoting lifelong healthy lifestyle choices. Students are encouraged to take responsibility for personal wellness as they investigate topics in physical fitness, healthy eating, weight management, psychosocial components of health, stress management, sexual health, disease awareness and prevention, substance use, misuse, and abuse, personal safety, and media awareness/consumerism. Download Course Outline

HOS2228: Wine, Food and Culture

An understanding of culture can be discovered by exploring eating and drinking customs. Students experience a virtual global tour, exploring culture, history and traditions through the lens of wine and food. Students acquire a sense of the customs of their culture and those of others. Through comparison, observation, discussion, and reflection, students discover something found in all cultures: the importance of food and drink.

Theme 3: Social and Cultural Understanding

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LIB1982: Reading for Recreation

Reading gives us knowledge and new ideas to draw from in the future. It tones the mind in ways similar to the way exercise tones the body. As a result, time spent in reading for recreation has benefits beyond the immediate appreciation of the text. Students examine appeal factors of various genres of fiction and non-fiction by reviewing the history and classics of each genre, considering the therapeutic values of reading, and examining recent trends in online reading and publishing.

Theme 1: Arts in Society

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MGT7330: Trends in Today's Workplace

In today's culture of work, every employee needs to be knowledgeable about current trends and issues in the workplace. Students explore emerging issues facing employees in today's technology-driven workplace and investigate the realities of social networking, diversity in the workplace, and work mobility.

Theme 3: Social and Cultural Understanding

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MVM8800: The Impact of the Car on North American Culture

Students explore the social, economic, political and environmental impact of the automobile on North American lives. Studying the history of the automobile from its introduction to the present day allows students to track the changes it has introduced to manufacturing, lifestyles, design principles, transportation systems, the environment, labour-management negotiation and economic organization.

Theme 3: Social and Cultural Understanding

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PRL7532: College and Career Success

Students develop and expand their abilities as lifelong learners. These abilities are essential to students as they take their place in college, community, family and working life. Course content includes awareness of self as a learner and study of learning, motivation and problem-solving theories. Important throughout are attitudes which help students to deal with a complex, changing world. Teaching/learning methods include classroom discussion and exercises, reflective journals to monitor, evaluate and guide the student's development, as well as lectures.

Theme 4: Personal Understanding

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PSI0003: Globalization and Sustainability

The rapid growth of the global economy raises fundamental questions: How do trade and politics affect development and the environment? What are the effects of free trade and the rise of multi-national corporations on local cultures? What are the effects of the “clash of cultures” produced by international travel, migration, and new social, collaborative technologies that send film, books, television, music and other “proprietary” content spinning around the world instantly? Is globalization environmentally sustainable? Students examine these and other questions and analyze the day-to-day choices raised by globalization in an increasingly interconnected world.

Theme 3: Social and Cultural Understanding

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PSI1702 Government of Canada

Students explore the Canadian governmental system and consider key principles of democracy and federalism. In addition, students analyze the impact of government on the lives of its citizens, as well as the ways in which citizens and communities affect the government. Finally, students examine the diverse political, national and ideological dynamics of Canadian politics.

Theme 2: Civic Life

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PSY7603: Introduction to Psychology

The following important concepts are examined: the biological basis of behaviour, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, memory, thought and language, development, motivation and emotion, personality, intelligence and assessment, health, stress and coping, psychological disorders, approaches to treatment and social psychology.

Theme 4: Personal Understanding

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RAD2001: Popular Culture

One dictionary definition of popular culture is the "totality of socially transmitted behaviour patterns, arts, beliefs, institutions, and all other products of human work and thought." This definition allows us great freedom and scope. Students examine recent North American popular culture including trends, fads, styles, theories and the cult of the new. By exploring our perceptions of culture and the trivialization of society, students begin to appreciate how the media has relentlessly helped to shape today's values. Through online research, assigned readings, and participation in self-directed learning, students critique popular culture's place in North American society, concentrating on their decade of choice.

Theme 3: Social and Cultural Understanding

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SOC2003: Understanding Human Sexuality

Students study human sexuality through an interdisciplinary approach. Students gain a basic understanding of human sexuality through an investigation of history, culture, physiology, sexual development, sexual behaviours, sexually transmitted diseases, attitudes, sex, deviance and sexual relationships.

Theme 4: Personal Understanding

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Theme 1 - Arts in Society

Rationale: Your capacity to recognize and evaluate artistic and creative achievements is useful in many aspects of life. Since artistic expression is a fundamental human activity that both reflects and anticipates developments in culture at large, its study enhances your cultural understanding and self-awareness.

Content: Courses in this theme group lead to an understanding of the importance of visual and creative arts in human affairs, of artists’ and writers’ perceptions of the world, and the means by which those perceptions are translated into visual, auditory, performance, literary, and other art forms. They also provide an appreciation of the aesthetic values used in examining works of art and possibly a direct experience in expressing perceptions artistically. The following Objectives define the general learning outcomes of courses in the Arts in Society General Education Theme:

Theme Objectives:

Art Itself

  1. Explore artists’ and writers’ perceptions of the world.
  2. Discuss the aesthetic values used in examining works of art.
  3. Evaluate artistic and creative achievements.

Social Context

  1. Explain how artistic expression is a fundamental human activity.
  2. Describe how art both reflects and anticipates developments in culture at large.
  3. Evaluate the importance of visual and creative arts in human affairs.

Meaning

  1. Explain how art produces meaning and affects audiences.
  2. Analyse how artistic perceptions of the world and human affairs are translated into artistic expression in various media.
  3. Evaluate art in relation to personal and cultural self-awareness.

Creation

  1. Express personal perceptions in an artistic medium

Rationale: For people to live responsibly and reach their potential as individuals and citizens in society, they must understand the human relationship patterns that underlie orderly conduct within that society’s various structural units. Informed people must understand the meaning of civic life in relation to diverse communities at the local, national, and global level, and be aware of international issues and their effects on Canada and its place in the international community.

Content: Courses in this area provide students with an understanding of the meaning of rights, freedoms, and participation in community and public life, in addition to a working knowledge of the structure and function of various levels of government in Canada and/or in an international context. They may also provide an historical understanding of major political issues affecting relations between these various levels and their constituents. The following Objectives define the general learning outcomes of courses in the Civic Life General Education Theme:

Theme Objectives:

One Human to Another

  1. Discuss what it means for people to live responsibly and reach their potential as individuals and citizens in society.
  2. Examine human relationship patterns that underlie the orderly interactions within society’s various structural units.

The Group

  1. Explain the meaning of rights, freedoms, and participation in community and public life.
  2. Summarize the function of various levels of government (municipal, provincial, national) in Canada and/or in an international context.
  3. Analyze the historical underpinnings of major political issues affecting relations between the various levels of government and their constituents in Canada.

Wider Context

  1. Compare civic life across diverse communities at the local, national, and global level.
  2. Discuss Canada’s place in the international community.
  3. Analyze international issues and their effects on Canada.

Rationale: Knowing the patterns and precedents of the past provides the means by which people may develop awareness of their place in contemporary culture and society. Such knowledge also helps frame an understanding of the main currents of one’s own culture and that of others across time in order to place one’s personal experience in the collective that constitutes culture at large.

Content: Courses in this area deal broadly with major social and cultural themes that define people and events historically and geographically. Many focus on the various ways that historical and contemporary events may be interpreted through available evidence. Students thus develop an appreciation for and understanding of the impact of socio-cultural, ethnic, and religious forces on individuals and groups. The following Objectives define the general learning outcomes of courses in the Social and Cultural Understanding General Education Theme:

Theme Objectives:

Past and Present—Here, There, and Everywhere

  1. Identify the patterns and precedents of the past that provide the means by which people may develop awareness of their place in contemporary culture and society.
  2. Examine the main currents of one’s own culture and that of others across time in order to place one’s personal experience in culture at large.
  3. Outline the major social and cultural themes that define people and events historically and geographically.

Making Sense of It All

  1. Analyze the various ways that historical and contemporary events may be interpreted through available evidence.
  2. Evaluate the impact of socio-cultural, economic, ethical, ethnic, and/or religious forces on groups, individuals, and yourself.

Rationale: Becoming the fully functional, integrated persons necessary to achieve vocational and financial success requires due attention to our physical, mental, emotional, social, sexual, and spiritual health. The long road to personhood can be a bumpy one without roadmaps through the various social systems and institutions that take us safely from early adulthood to retirement.

Content: Courses in this area focus on understanding one’s personal development, economic function, social life, place in the environment and universe, challenges and opportunities, setbacks and success, and meaning and purpose. Courses facilitating the study of human social behaviour systematically allow students to understand how individuals can function and succeed in a variety of contexts. The following Objectives define the general learning outcomes of courses in the Personal Understanding General Education Theme:

Theme Objectives:

Placing Ourselves

  1. Explore individual development, economic function, social life, place in the environment and universe, challenges and opportunities, setbacks and success, and meaning and purpose.
  2. Consider human social behaviour systematically.
  3. Explain how individuals may navigate various social systems and institutions to become integrated physiological and psychological entities.

Finding Our Potential Selves

  1. Compare individual functioning and success in a variety of institutional contexts (e.g., educational, vocational, commercial, recreational, nuptial, familial, etc.).
  2. Analyze the ideal of being fully functioning persons vocationally, physically, mentally, emotionally, socially, sexually, and spiritually.

Rationale: Matter and energy form the basis of all living and non-living systems, the nature and interactions of which are the focus of all scientific study. Science provides an understanding of all natural phenomena, while technology utilizes them for human benefit. As science driven by economic motors, technology increasingly impacts all aspects of human endeavour with myriad psychosocial, cultural, economic, and philosophical implications. For example, the integration of computers into almost every aspect of human life—unique in human history—has far-reaching implications for the environment that supports us and even for our survival as a species.

Content: Courses in this area range in focus from the basics of the scientific method to the diverse technological applications that have changed—and will continue to change—our lives for better and worse. While students may develop a wary eye for the dangers of technological excess and encroachment into every aspect of our collective being, they also explore ways that new technology can be used to right the wrongs of old technology, especially with regard to the environment. Other technologies explored may also bring us to a deeper understanding of ourselves and our place in the environment and universe. The following Objectives define the general learning outcomes of courses in the Science and Technology General Education Theme:

Theme Objectives:

Scientific Foundations

  1. Explore the nature of matter, energy, and related universal concepts in science.
  2. Consider the nature and interactions of living and non-living systems in the universe.
  3. Illustrate the relationships between basic areas of science such as chemistry, physics, astronomy, geology, and biology, as well as mathematics and the social sciences.
  4. Apply the scientific method to conduct basic scientific inquiry.
  5. Discuss the impact of science in a world that still clings to traditions and superstitions.

Technological Advancement

  1. Discuss the role of technological innovation in a world imperiled by previous technologies.
  2. Evaluate the increasing impact of technology on all aspects of human endeavour.
  3. Analyze the myriad psychosocial, economic, and philosophical implications of technology.

Theme 5: Science and Technology

Content: Courses in this area range in focus from the basics of the scientific method to the diverse technological applications that have changed—and will continue to change—our lives for better and worse. While students may develop a wary eye for the dangers of technological excess and encroachment into every aspect of our collective being, they also explore ways that new technology can be used to right the wrongs of old technology, especially with regard to the environment. Other technologies explored may also bring us to a deeper understanding of ourselves and our place in the environment and universe. The following Objectives define the general learning outcomes of courses in the Science and Technology General Education Theme:

Theme Objectives:

Scientific Foundations

  1. Explore the nature of matter, energy, and related universal concepts in science.
  2. Consider the nature and interactions of living and non-living systems in the universe.
  3. Illustrate the relationships between basic areas of science such as chemistry, physics, astronomy, geology, and biology, as well as mathematics and the social sciences.
  4. Apply the scientific method to conduct basic scientific inquiry.
  5. Discuss the impact of science in a world that still clings to traditions and superstitions.

Technological Advancement

  1. Discuss the role of technological innovation in a world imperiled by previous technologies.
  2. Evaluate the increasing impact of technology on all aspects of human endeavour.
  3. Analyze the myriad psychosocial, economic, and philosophical implications of technology.

 What is General Education?

Employers value staff who have a broad-based education. It makes them more adaptable in a workplace that is constantly changing. As a result, General Education courses are offered to help students gain a wider view of the world by enrolling in courses that are outside their chosen program. In the 1990’s, across the province, employers expressed concerns that graduates of community colleges required a more broadly-based education to prepare for their careers in a rapidly-changing workplace. The Ontario government responded by introducing new curriculum requirements for college programs, requirements that focused on employability skills and general education courses. Depending on the length of your program, there are a number of mandated general education courses in your program of studies and one or two general education online electives. General education courses cover areas of general interest and are divided into five themes:

  • Theme 1: Arts in SocietyGED0011
  • Theme 2: Civic LifeGED0012
  • Theme 3: Social and Cultural UnderstandingGED0013
  • Theme 4: Personal UnderstandingGED0014
  • Theme 5: Science and TechnologyGED0015

The knowledge gained from these courses is intended to develop a good understanding of social responsibility and citizenship, and strengthen a student’s ability to participate actively and fully in society. One or two general education courses in your program are taken as online electives.

[ How Do I Register in My Elective? ]