Game Development


Our program prepares the student for careers in the increasingly competitive and in demand profession of gameĀ development.

Emphasis is placed on developing and honing hands-on skills in a team oriented environment that culminates in creating a game title for a graduating project.

Ontario College Advanced Diploma
3 Year(s)

Program Code: 3013X01FWO
Academic Year: Not a new program.


Our Program

This three-year Ontario College Advanced Diploma program prepares students for careers as game developers, a profession in demand by various industries including entertainment, education, government and consumer products. Strong emphasis is placed on developing the hands-on component which is offered through courses in game design and development, traditional and digital imaging, authoring, animation and programming. Computer programming is an essential component of the program. Students also complete individual and team-based projects.

Bring Your Own Device (BYOD): Students are expected to have and use a laptop or mobile computing device when registered in this on-campus program. Hardware and software specifications required by your program are outlined at http://algonquincollege.com/byod. Mobile devices/laptops and supplies can be purchased directly from Algonquin`s New Technology Store at educational rates.

SUCCESS FACTORS

This program is well-suited for students who:

  • Have strong observational and analytical skills.
  • Enjoy a hands-on approach to learning about the game development industry.
  • Like using computers and technology applications.
  • Are critical thinkers.

Your Career

Graduates may find employment as a game developer, game programmer, software designer, software developer, graphics programmer, game designer, game artist, character modeler, environment modeler, texture artist, game animator, game tester, project manager, level designer. Most opportunities in game development exist outside of the Ottawa region.

Courses

Programs at Algonquin College are delivered using a variety of instruction modes. Courses may be offered in the classroom or lab, entirely online, or in a hybrid mode which combines classroom sessions with online learning activities. Upon registration, each full-time student is provided an Algonquin email account which is used to communicate important information about program or course events.
Level: 01 Hours
ENL1813M Communication remains an essential skill sought by employers, regardless of discipline or field of study. Using a practical, vocation-oriented approach, students focus on meeting the requirements of effective communication. Through a combination of lectures, exercises, and independent learning, students practice writing, speaking, reading, listening, locating and documenting information, and using technology to communicate professionally. Students develop and strengthen communication skills that contribute to success in both educational and workplace environments. Communications I Communication remains an essential skill sought by employers, regardless of discipline or field of study. Using a practical, vocation-oriented approach, students focus on meeting the requirements of effective communication. Through a combination of lectures, exercises, and independent learning, students practice writing, speaking, reading, listening, locating and documenting information, and using technology to communicate professionally. Students develop and strengthen communication skills that contribute to success in both educational and workplace environments. 45.0
GAM1503 Through a specialized series of drawing exercises students learn how to perceive edges, spaces, relationships, light and shadow. These basic skills lead to the development of a unique style of visual expression that allows students to conceptualize, plan and communicate visually. Drawing Essentials I Through a specialized series of drawing exercises students learn how to perceive edges, spaces, relationships, light and shadow. These basic skills lead to the development of a unique style of visual expression that allows students to conceptualize, plan and communicate visually. 45.0
GAM1506 Sounds that enhance gameplay are an essential part of the user experience. Students learn to integrate professional quality audio into the games and video trailers they create. Focus is placed on audio capture, mixing, composition and synchronization with other assets, dubbing, narration, noise reduction, compression, the creation of music loops and finally integrating sounds into a simple game framework. Students create custom sounds for a variety of uses required in a video game or a game trailer production. Sound Design Sounds that enhance gameplay are an essential part of the user experience. Students learn to integrate professional quality audio into the games and video trailers they create. Focus is placed on audio capture, mixing, composition and synchronization with other assets, dubbing, narration, noise reduction, compression, the creation of music loops and finally integrating sounds into a simple game framework. Students create custom sounds for a variety of uses required in a video game or a game trailer production. 45.0
GAM1535 Students address the architectural context and functional requirements of interior spaces, as well as details of furnishing and decoration. Students learn how to structure interior spaces in three dimensions using a variety of drafting techniques, such as orthographic projections, dimensioning, sectional views, reference photography and technical drawings. Vehicles and prop design are also covered. Skills learned enable the student to demonstrate their ability to plan their designs in a detailed and structured manner which is then used in the creation of 3D objects and environments. Technical Drawing Students address the architectural context and functional requirements of interior spaces, as well as details of furnishing and decoration. Students learn how to structure interior spaces in three dimensions using a variety of drafting techniques, such as orthographic projections, dimensioning, sectional views, reference photography and technical drawings. Vehicles and prop design are also covered. Skills learned enable the student to demonstrate their ability to plan their designs in a detailed and structured manner which is then used in the creation of 3D objects and environments. 45.0
GAM1536 Students learn how to deconstruct familiar game elements and formulate these elements into concepts and finally reconstruct these concepts into original programmable game mechanics. Emphasis is on pseudo code, object analysis, object design, object-oriented programming concepts, class hierarchies and creating algorithms as they relate to computer games. Game Programming I Students learn how to deconstruct familiar game elements and formulate these elements into concepts and finally reconstruct these concepts into original programmable game mechanics. Emphasis is on pseudo code, object analysis, object design, object-oriented programming concepts, class hierarchies and creating algorithms as they relate to computer games. 45.0
GAM1545 C++ is a mainstay object oriented (OO) programming language and is a foundation language of the game development industry. Best practices, such as programming with an integrated development environment (IDE), using a debugger, using version control and writing programs with appropriate naming conventions and style are learned and practised. Students receive a comprehensive, in-depth overview of the C++ language including syntax, data types, logical operators, as well as object class structure. Fundamental OO principles are introduced including inheritance and polymorphism. Also covered are the use of the preprocessor, compiler and linker and creating release and debug builds. Students design, write and debug a game from scratch that includes multiple classes consisting of multiple functions and variables, varied data structures and decision paths. Programming Fundamentals I C++ is a mainstay object oriented (OO) programming language and is a foundation language of the game development industry. Best practices, such as programming with an integrated development environment (IDE), using a debugger, using version control and writing programs with appropriate naming conventions and style are learned and practised. Students receive a comprehensive, in-depth overview of the C++ language including syntax, data types, logical operators, as well as object class structure. Fundamental OO principles are introduced including inheritance and polymorphism. Also covered are the use of the preprocessor, compiler and linker and creating release and debug builds. Students design, write and debug a game from scratch that includes multiple classes consisting of multiple functions and variables, varied data structures and decision paths. 90.0
MAT8100 The study of algebraic and transcendental functions is an essential prerequisite to Calculus. Students manipulate algebraic expressions, solve algebraic equations and linear systems, and learn the properties of algebraic and transcendental functions. Students graph a variety of functions and solve problems involving complex numbers, trigonometry and vectors. Essential Mathematics The study of algebraic and transcendental functions is an essential prerequisite to Calculus. Students manipulate algebraic expressions, solve algebraic equations and linear systems, and learn the properties of algebraic and transcendental functions. Students graph a variety of functions and solve problems involving complex numbers, trigonometry and vectors. 45.0
Level: 02 Hours
GAM1507 Students are introduced to concepts and tools used in the creation of digital images. A variety of software tools and techniques are introduced to enhance and alter existing images, as well as graphic creation. The focus is to support all the 2D assets which consist of all image requirements in game design. Emphasis is placed on creating texture atlases, sprite sheets, fonts and concept art. Package design and promotional art are also covered. Digital Imaging Students are introduced to concepts and tools used in the creation of digital images. A variety of software tools and techniques are introduced to enhance and alter existing images, as well as graphic creation. The focus is to support all the 2D assets which consist of all image requirements in game design. Emphasis is placed on creating texture atlases, sprite sheets, fonts and concept art. Package design and promotional art are also covered. 45.0
GAM1508 Students enhance their techniques and how to rapidly apply these techniques, such as perspective, shading, and texturing in order to create concept art for video games. Areas covered include interior and exterior environments, vehicles, characters, animals and fictional creature creation.

Prerequisites: GAM1503
Drawing Essentials II Students enhance their techniques and how to rapidly apply these techniques, such as perspective, shading, and texturing in order to create concept art for video games. Areas covered include interior and exterior environments, vehicles, characters, animals and fictional creature creation.

Prerequisites: GAM1503
45.0
GAM1510 Students develop a foundation in the theory and practice of game design. Topics include game characteristics, game mechanics, game theory, documentation and play testing. Students spend the majority of their time working in a group while applying these principles in the form of a board game using the iterative process. The culmination of this work is a fully playable board game and professionally produced prototype. Game Design I Students develop a foundation in the theory and practice of game design. Topics include game characteristics, game mechanics, game theory, documentation and play testing. Students spend the majority of their time working in a group while applying these principles in the form of a board game using the iterative process. The culmination of this work is a fully playable board game and professionally produced prototype. 45.0
GAM1520 The best game developers are idea machines! Have you ever wondered how they got that way? Emphasis is placed on developing creative and iterative instincts needed for developing video game ideas-RAPIDLY! Students are continuously experimenting with game play mechanics, creating game ideas and pitching these ideas to their peers and then attempting to implement them. The implementation is validated by peers, the validation data is analyzed to discover any lessons that can be learned to improve, keep or discard the idea. Students are empowered to create, experiment and not be afraid to discard game mechanic ideas. Students are enabled to positively receive and also to present constructive criticism, are confident when developing new mechanics, testing these and then taking the proactive decision to improve, keep or discard them.

Prerequisites: GAM1506
Rapid Prototyping The best game developers are idea machines! Have you ever wondered how they got that way? Emphasis is placed on developing creative and iterative instincts needed for developing video game ideas-RAPIDLY! Students are continuously experimenting with game play mechanics, creating game ideas and pitching these ideas to their peers and then attempting to implement them. The implementation is validated by peers, the validation data is analyzed to discover any lessons that can be learned to improve, keep or discard the idea. Students are empowered to create, experiment and not be afraid to discard game mechanic ideas. Students are enabled to positively receive and also to present constructive criticism, are confident when developing new mechanics, testing these and then taking the proactive decision to improve, keep or discard them.

Prerequisites: GAM1506
45.0
GAM1530 Students examine some of the basic concepts of psychology, such as learning, motivation, perception, sensation, information processing, emotions, stress and relaxation and are able to effectively contribute as members of a team. Psychology and Group Dynamics Students examine some of the basic concepts of psychology, such as learning, motivation, perception, sensation, information processing, emotions, stress and relaxation and are able to effectively contribute as members of a team. 45.0
GAM1537 Students enhance and reinforce their acquired knowledge by implementing basic algorithms and data structures using the C++ language. Topics include use of pointers, memory management, inheritance and polymorphism. Emphasis is placed on debugging techniques where students gain a thorough understanding of stack and heap memory and how to find and fix memory leaks. Upon successful completion students are able to effectively debug a complex game program that implements pointers, memory management, inheritance and polymorphism.

Prerequisites: GAM1545 and MAT8100
Programming Fundamentals II Students enhance and reinforce their acquired knowledge by implementing basic algorithms and data structures using the C++ language. Topics include use of pointers, memory management, inheritance and polymorphism. Emphasis is placed on debugging techniques where students gain a thorough understanding of stack and heap memory and how to find and fix memory leaks. Upon successful completion students are able to effectively debug a complex game program that implements pointers, memory management, inheritance and polymorphism.

Prerequisites: GAM1545 and MAT8100
45.0
GAM1538 Students expand their knowledge of how to deconstruct sophisticated game elements, formulate these elements into concepts and reconstruct these concepts into original programmable game mechanics. Emphasis is on creating an object oriented game design and implementing it into code using industry best practices.

Prerequisites: GAM1536
Game Programming II Students expand their knowledge of how to deconstruct sophisticated game elements, formulate these elements into concepts and reconstruct these concepts into original programmable game mechanics. Emphasis is on creating an object oriented game design and implementing it into code using industry best practices.

Prerequisites: GAM1536
45.0
GAM1544 Game computations are math and physic calculations that bring video game to life! Students learn math and physics fundamentals and apply those concepts into game code. These fundamentals include, but are not limited to, the unit circle, 2D vectors, trigonometric functions, determining the distance between two points, line intersection, circle intersection, rectangle intersection, acceleration/deceleration, momentum, trajectories friction and timing calculations.

Prerequisites: GAM1545 and MAT8100
Game and Graphics Computations I Game computations are math and physic calculations that bring video game to life! Students learn math and physics fundamentals and apply those concepts into game code. These fundamentals include, but are not limited to, the unit circle, 2D vectors, trigonometric functions, determining the distance between two points, line intersection, circle intersection, rectangle intersection, acceleration/deceleration, momentum, trajectories friction and timing calculations.

Prerequisites: GAM1545 and MAT8100
45.0
Level: 03 Hours
ENL2013 Storytelling and the components of story are introduced. Students develop storytelling skills and an understanding of what story form is. Students learn to apply scripting techniques to develop game scripts. Students also learn what makes characters "come alive" and the role a "good story" has in the development of a video game. Communications II: Scriptwriting Storytelling and the components of story are introduced. Students develop storytelling skills and an understanding of what story form is. Students learn to apply scripting techniques to develop game scripts. Students also learn what makes characters "come alive" and the role a "good story" has in the development of a video game. 45.0
GAM1511 Design, layout, type, readability, color theory and interaction are the subject focus. Students learn to create interfaces for games that follow standard principles of human-computer interaction. Topics include interactive theory, psychology of interface design, art aesthetics and navigation controls, diegetic and non-diegetic interfaces. Students evaluate the effectiveness of user interface designs. Students produce intuitive user interfaces that enhance the game players' experience.

Prerequisites: GAM1507
Interface Design Design, layout, type, readability, color theory and interaction are the subject focus. Students learn to create interfaces for games that follow standard principles of human-computer interaction. Topics include interactive theory, psychology of interface design, art aesthetics and navigation controls, diegetic and non-diegetic interfaces. Students evaluate the effectiveness of user interface designs. Students produce intuitive user interfaces that enhance the game players' experience.

Prerequisites: GAM1507
45.0
GAM1516 Combined with knowledge of object-oriented design and object oriented programming, students integrate game play mechanics, non-player character artificial intelligence, goal seeking, collision detection and response, game physics, graphical effects, game shell and user interface. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow, best practices, group work, and presentations to peers, constructive peer review and learning relevant applicable technologies. Students work in groups to build a video game.

Prerequisites: GAM1537 and GAM1538 and GAM1544
High Level Development Combined with knowledge of object-oriented design and object oriented programming, students integrate game play mechanics, non-player character artificial intelligence, goal seeking, collision detection and response, game physics, graphical effects, game shell and user interface. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow, best practices, group work, and presentations to peers, constructive peer review and learning relevant applicable technologies. Students work in groups to build a video game.

Prerequisites: GAM1537 and GAM1538 and GAM1544
90.0
GAM1522 Students learn how to apply professional filmmaking techniques, rules and formulas in a video game environment using a full range of tools and assets. Areas of film production covered include cinematography, lighting, set design, casting, editing, storyboards and special effects. Students develop the skills needed to plan and produce engaging cinematic, cut scenes and game trailers.

Prerequisites: GAM1506
Cinematics Students learn how to apply professional filmmaking techniques, rules and formulas in a video game environment using a full range of tools and assets. Areas of film production covered include cinematography, lighting, set design, casting, editing, storyboards and special effects. Students develop the skills needed to plan and produce engaging cinematic, cut scenes and game trailers.

Prerequisites: GAM1506
45.0
GAM1539 The fundamentals of level design for video games are introduced. Topics include genre analysis, game play styles and limitations, game play mechanics, level construction and architecture techniques, design principles and scripting. Students are introduced to industry standard tools to build levels, and learn how the use of these tools integrates into a workflow. They learn how levels are created using an iterative process, from design concept to production and play test. Theories and principles from a variety of disciplines are integrated to develop the fundamental skills for a level designer, which can then be applied to various projects across many platforms.

Prerequisites: GAM1510
Level Design I The fundamentals of level design for video games are introduced. Topics include genre analysis, game play styles and limitations, game play mechanics, level construction and architecture techniques, design principles and scripting. Students are introduced to industry standard tools to build levels, and learn how the use of these tools integrates into a workflow. They learn how levels are created using an iterative process, from design concept to production and play test. Theories and principles from a variety of disciplines are integrated to develop the fundamental skills for a level designer, which can then be applied to various projects across many platforms.

Prerequisites: GAM1510
45.0
GAM1540 Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a foundation cornerstone of game play that enhances the user experience. Students learn to analyze and formulate simulated behaviours for various non-player character classes found in typical video games. Creating conceptual behaviour designs and implementing each is practised through the use of the C++ programming language. Students create dynamic AI systems required for the game industry.

Prerequisites: GAM1537 and GAM1538 and GAM1544
Game Programming III Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a foundation cornerstone of game play that enhances the user experience. Students learn to analyze and formulate simulated behaviours for various non-player character classes found in typical video games. Creating conceptual behaviour designs and implementing each is practised through the use of the C++ programming language. Students create dynamic AI systems required for the game industry.

Prerequisites: GAM1537 and GAM1538 and GAM1544
45.0
GAM1546 Game computations can be performed on specialized hardware called Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). Students are introduced to the design of modem GPU hardware and learn the feature set by which each GPU is evaluated and compared. Focus is on games, which are implemented in 2D, such as side scrolling and top down games. Topics include, but are not limited to data structures, vector manipulation, matrix transformations, vertex shaders, fragment shaders, texturing, game flow and memory management.

Prerequisites: GAM1507 and GAM1537 and GAM1538 and GAM1544
Game and Graphics Computations II Game computations can be performed on specialized hardware called Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). Students are introduced to the design of modem GPU hardware and learn the feature set by which each GPU is evaluated and compared. Focus is on games, which are implemented in 2D, such as side scrolling and top down games. Topics include, but are not limited to data structures, vector manipulation, matrix transformations, vertex shaders, fragment shaders, texturing, game flow and memory management.

Prerequisites: GAM1507 and GAM1537 and GAM1538 and GAM1544
45.0
Level: 04 Hours
GAM1512 Game assets consist of all the virtual objects that make up the interesting and compelling visuals that are part of a modern 3D video game. These virtual objects include characters, vehicles, buildings and landscapes which are all needed to create a vibrant world. Students are introduced to how game assets are created in a professional game development pipeline by learning how to use sophisticated asset modeling and manipulation software. Topics include the fundamentals of game asset creation, such as polygon modeling, texturing, lighting and exporting assets to game engines. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow and best practices.

Prerequisites: GAM1507 and GAM1508 and GAM1511 and GAM1535
Game Assets I Game assets consist of all the virtual objects that make up the interesting and compelling visuals that are part of a modern 3D video game. These virtual objects include characters, vehicles, buildings and landscapes which are all needed to create a vibrant world. Students are introduced to how game assets are created in a professional game development pipeline by learning how to use sophisticated asset modeling and manipulation software. Topics include the fundamentals of game asset creation, such as polygon modeling, texturing, lighting and exporting assets to game engines. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow and best practices.

Prerequisites: GAM1507 and GAM1508 and GAM1511 and GAM1535
45.0
GAM1528 Multi-player games are a driving force in computer games. Multi-player gaming is a major component of our society. Students learn about the technology behind multi-player games and gain an understanding of networking. Students learn the fundamentals of exchanging data over the Internet, and complete assignments leading them to the creation of a simple multi-player networked game. These games can have thousands of simultaneous players in a shared virtual world. Students examine the unique technical challenges that massive multi-player games face, discussing algorithms for bandwidth management, game synchronization, server load balancing, user authentication, security and cheating prevention.

Prerequisites: GAM1540
Multi-Player Network Gaming Multi-player games are a driving force in computer games. Multi-player gaming is a major component of our society. Students learn about the technology behind multi-player games and gain an understanding of networking. Students learn the fundamentals of exchanging data over the Internet, and complete assignments leading them to the creation of a simple multi-player networked game. These games can have thousands of simultaneous players in a shared virtual world. Students examine the unique technical challenges that massive multi-player games face, discussing algorithms for bandwidth management, game synchronization, server load balancing, user authentication, security and cheating prevention.

Prerequisites: GAM1540
90.0
GAM1532 Students combine all elements learned in courses to develop a C++ based game for a variety of game platforms. Students learn techniques to optimize code for speed, memory use and re-usability. Topics covered deal with advanced programming concepts, such as design patterns, internationalization, creating quality and sustainable documentation. Students write game programs that are optimized for mobile and desktop platforms.

Prerequisites: GAM1540
Game Programming IV Students combine all elements learned in courses to develop a C++ based game for a variety of game platforms. Students learn techniques to optimize code for speed, memory use and re-usability. Topics covered deal with advanced programming concepts, such as design patterns, internationalization, creating quality and sustainable documentation. Students write game programs that are optimized for mobile and desktop platforms.

Prerequisites: GAM1540
45.0
GAM1541 Students enhance their knowledge of level design. Topics include genre analysis, game play styles and limitations, game play mechanics, level construction and architecture techniques, design principles and scripting. Students continue to practise using industry standard tools to build levels, and integrate these tools into a workflow. Emphasis is continued on practising using an iterative process, from design concept through to production and play test. Students create a complete 3D level, with lighting, backstory and scripting.

Prerequisites: GAM1539
Level Design II Students enhance their knowledge of level design. Topics include genre analysis, game play styles and limitations, game play mechanics, level construction and architecture techniques, design principles and scripting. Students continue to practise using industry standard tools to build levels, and integrate these tools into a workflow. Emphasis is continued on practising using an iterative process, from design concept through to production and play test. Students create a complete 3D level, with lighting, backstory and scripting.

Prerequisites: GAM1539
90.0
GAM1542 A 3rd dimension to previously learned 2D concepts is added. 3D is implemented in all aspects of modern console games, mobile games and desktop games. A 3D game computation is any calculation made in 3 dimensional space. 3D computations are required for determining object translations, object rotations, viewing volumes and projections, collision detection and game logic. Students focus on the fundamentals of 3D game computations. These fundamentals include, but are not limited to, 3D vector operations, normals, matrix manipulation, matrix order of operations, rotations, determining the distance between two points in 3D space, plane intersection, sphere intersection, bounding box and lighting calculations.

Prerequisites: GAM1546
Game and Graphics Computations III A 3rd dimension to previously learned 2D concepts is added. 3D is implemented in all aspects of modern console games, mobile games and desktop games. A 3D game computation is any calculation made in 3 dimensional space. 3D computations are required for determining object translations, object rotations, viewing volumes and projections, collision detection and game logic. Students focus on the fundamentals of 3D game computations. These fundamentals include, but are not limited to, 3D vector operations, normals, matrix manipulation, matrix order of operations, rotations, determining the distance between two points in 3D space, plane intersection, sphere intersection, bounding box and lighting calculations.

Prerequisites: GAM1546
45.0
Choose one from equivalencies: Hours
GED3013 Students choose one course, from a group of general education electives, which meets one of the following four theme requirements: Arts in Society, Civic Life, Social and Cultural Understanding, and Science and Technology.

Equivalencies: ARC9001 or DSN2001 or ENV0002 or FAM1218 or GED5300 or GEN1957 or GEN2000 or GEN2007 or HIS0001 or HIS2000 or HOS2228 or LIB1982 or MGT7330 or MVM8800 or RAD2001 or GED5002 or GED5004 or GED5005 or GED5006 or GED6022 or GED5009 or GED1896 or PSI0003 or GED5003
General Education Elective Students choose one course, from a group of general education electives, which meets one of the following four theme requirements: Arts in Society, Civic Life, Social and Cultural Understanding, and Science and Technology.

Equivalencies: ARC9001 or DSN2001 or ENV0002 or FAM1218 or GED5300 or GEN1957 or GEN2000 or GEN2007 or HIS0001 or HIS2000 or HOS2228 or LIB1982 or MGT7330 or MVM8800 or RAD2001 or GED5002 or GED5004 or GED5005 or GED5006 or GED6022 or GED5009 or GED1896 or PSI0003 or GED5003
45.0
Level: 05 Hours
GAM1550 The Capstone Project which is a multi-discipline team-based project simulates the entire industry life cycle of a video game in development from concept to completion with a focus on teamwork. Students focus on their preferred discipline of design, art, programming and/or management. Focus is on exploring, developing and testing game mechanics, prototyping controls, non-playable character AI and experimenting with physics. Before going into full production, many aspects of video game playability are researched and explored. Consideration is also given to network programming, multiplatform constraints and game state management. Students focus on best practices required for building a high quality game, group work, meeting tight deadlines, peer evaluation, and giving and receiving constructive criticism.

Prerequisites: GAM1532

Co-requisites: GAM1551 and GAM1552 and GAM1553 and GAM1554
Capstone Pre-Production: Gameplay Programming The Capstone Project which is a multi-discipline team-based project simulates the entire industry life cycle of a video game in development from concept to completion with a focus on teamwork. Students focus on their preferred discipline of design, art, programming and/or management. Focus is on exploring, developing and testing game mechanics, prototyping controls, non-playable character AI and experimenting with physics. Before going into full production, many aspects of video game playability are researched and explored. Consideration is also given to network programming, multiplatform constraints and game state management. Students focus on best practices required for building a high quality game, group work, meeting tight deadlines, peer evaluation, and giving and receiving constructive criticism.

Prerequisites: GAM1532

Co-requisites: GAM1551 and GAM1552 and GAM1553 and GAM1554
90.0
GAM1551 The Capstone Project which is a multi-discipline team-based project simulates the entire industry life cycle of a video game in development from concept to completion with a focus on teamwork. Students focus on their preferred discipline of design, art, programming and/or management. Students research and implement special visual effects for their Capstone group project. Advanced shaders, sophisticated cameras, GPU issues relating to multi-platform development, and advanced rendering techniques are studied and implemented. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow, best practices, group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and other applicable technologies.

Prerequisites: GAM1542

Co-requisites: GAM1550 and GAM1552 and GAM1553 and GAM1554
Capstone Pre-Production: Game and Graphics Computations The Capstone Project which is a multi-discipline team-based project simulates the entire industry life cycle of a video game in development from concept to completion with a focus on teamwork. Students focus on their preferred discipline of design, art, programming and/or management. Students research and implement special visual effects for their Capstone group project. Advanced shaders, sophisticated cameras, GPU issues relating to multi-platform development, and advanced rendering techniques are studied and implemented. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow, best practices, group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and other applicable technologies.

Prerequisites: GAM1542

Co-requisites: GAM1550 and GAM1552 and GAM1553 and GAM1554
45.0
GAM1552 The Capstone Project which is a multi-discipline team-based project simulates the entire industry life cycle of a video game in development from concept to completion with a focus on teamwork. Students focus on their preferred discipline of design, art, programming and/or management. Students complete the concept and Pre-production phases of game development. Students are guided through concept formation. Pre-production starts with planning for game design, documentation, and implementation and ultimately results in a playable demo of their game. Agile methodologies are introduced and projects are developed using an iterative approach. Scoping and risk analysis are also covered, as well as budgeting and financial analysis. Focus is on best practices required for building a high quality game, group work, meeting tight deadlines, peer evaluation, and giving and receiving constructive criticism. The course culminates in a publisher greenlight presentation of the teams' playable game demos.

Co-requisites: GAM1550 and GAM1551 and GAM1553 and GAM1554
Capstone Pre-Production: Project Management The Capstone Project which is a multi-discipline team-based project simulates the entire industry life cycle of a video game in development from concept to completion with a focus on teamwork. Students focus on their preferred discipline of design, art, programming and/or management. Students complete the concept and Pre-production phases of game development. Students are guided through concept formation. Pre-production starts with planning for game design, documentation, and implementation and ultimately results in a playable demo of their game. Agile methodologies are introduced and projects are developed using an iterative approach. Scoping and risk analysis are also covered, as well as budgeting and financial analysis. Focus is on best practices required for building a high quality game, group work, meeting tight deadlines, peer evaluation, and giving and receiving constructive criticism. The course culminates in a publisher greenlight presentation of the teams' playable game demos.

Co-requisites: GAM1550 and GAM1551 and GAM1553 and GAM1554
45.0
GAM1553 The Capstone Project is a multi-discipline team based project. The Capstone Project simulates the entire industry life cycle of a video game in development from concept to completion with a focus on teamwork. Students focus on their preferred discipline of design, art, programming and/or management. Students build on the concepts learned and applied in 3D Game Assets I. Game assets are the virtual objects that make up the interesting and compelling visuals that are part of a modern 3D video game. These virtual objects include characters, vehicles, buildings and landscapes which are all needed to create a vibrant world for their Capstone group project. Students continue to refine their skills in 3D game asset creation including modeling, rigging, skinning and animation in a professional game development pipeline. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow and best practices in a highly collaborative atmosphere.

Prerequisites: GAM1512 and GAM1541

Co-requisites: GAM1550 and GAM1551 and GAM1552 and GAM1554
Capstone Pre-Production: Game Assets The Capstone Project is a multi-discipline team based project. The Capstone Project simulates the entire industry life cycle of a video game in development from concept to completion with a focus on teamwork. Students focus on their preferred discipline of design, art, programming and/or management. Students build on the concepts learned and applied in 3D Game Assets I. Game assets are the virtual objects that make up the interesting and compelling visuals that are part of a modern 3D video game. These virtual objects include characters, vehicles, buildings and landscapes which are all needed to create a vibrant world for their Capstone group project. Students continue to refine their skills in 3D game asset creation including modeling, rigging, skinning and animation in a professional game development pipeline. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow and best practices in a highly collaborative atmosphere.

Prerequisites: GAM1512 and GAM1541

Co-requisites: GAM1550 and GAM1551 and GAM1552 and GAM1554
90.0
GAM1554 The Capstone Project is a multi-discipline team based project. The Capstone Project simulates the entire industry life cycle of a video game in development from concept to completion with a focus on teamwork. Students focus on their preferred discipline of design, art, programming and/or management. Students are mentored by faculty and industry topic experts to experiment and implement game mechanics and ideas in Pre-production. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow, best practices, group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and other applicable technologies. The Capstone Studio gives the student teams' unregimented access to state of the art equipment to work on the development of their Capstone projects. Students have support of advisors from the various game disciplines during studio time who help guide them through the Pre-production period. Students consistently exhibit the ability to work as an effective team player and consistently met milestone deliverables.

Co-requisites: GAM1550 and GAM1551 and GAM1552 and GAM1553
Capstone Game Studio I The Capstone Project is a multi-discipline team based project. The Capstone Project simulates the entire industry life cycle of a video game in development from concept to completion with a focus on teamwork. Students focus on their preferred discipline of design, art, programming and/or management. Students are mentored by faculty and industry topic experts to experiment and implement game mechanics and ideas in Pre-production. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow, best practices, group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and other applicable technologies. The Capstone Studio gives the student teams' unregimented access to state of the art equipment to work on the development of their Capstone projects. Students have support of advisors from the various game disciplines during studio time who help guide them through the Pre-production period. Students consistently exhibit the ability to work as an effective team player and consistently met milestone deliverables.

Co-requisites: GAM1550 and GAM1551 and GAM1552 and GAM1553
45.0
Choose one from equivalencies: Hours
GED3013 Students choose one course, from a group of general education electives, which meets one of the following four theme requirements: Arts in Society, Civic Life, Social and Cultural Understanding, and Science and Technology.

Equivalencies: ARC9001 or DSN2001 or ENV0002 or FAM1218 or GED5300 or GEN1957 or GEN2000 or GEN2007 or HIS0001 or HIS2000 or HOS2228 or LIB1982 or MGT7330 or MVM8800 or RAD2001 or GED5002 or GED5004 or GED5005 or GED5006 or GED6022 or GED5009 or GED1896 or PSI0003 or GED5003
General Education Elective Students choose one course, from a group of general education electives, which meets one of the following four theme requirements: Arts in Society, Civic Life, Social and Cultural Understanding, and Science and Technology.

Equivalencies: ARC9001 or DSN2001 or ENV0002 or FAM1218 or GED5300 or GEN1957 or GEN2000 or GEN2007 or HIS0001 or HIS2000 or HOS2228 or LIB1982 or MGT7330 or MVM8800 or RAD2001 or GED5002 or GED5004 or GED5005 or GED5006 or GED6022 or GED5009 or GED1896 or PSI0003 or GED5003
45.0
Level: 06 Hours
ENL2014 Students learn to create professional documentation for the purposes of the gaming industry. Extensive instruction is provided on resume and cover letter writing, portfolio development, email etiquette, telephone skills, memos and self-promotions. Communications III: Business Communications Students learn to create professional documentation for the purposes of the gaming industry. Extensive instruction is provided on resume and cover letter writing, portfolio development, email etiquette, telephone skills, memos and self-promotions. 45.0
GAM1560 The Capstone Project which is a multi-discipline team-based project simulates the entire industry life cycle of a video game in development from concept to completion with a focus on teamwork. Students focus on their preferred discipline of design, art, programming and/or management. Students build on the knowledge gained in Capstone Pre-production and Production Gameplay Programming. Emphasis is placed on character animation, transition control, advanced peripherals, porting to multiple platforms, performance optimization, stress testing, unit testing, bug reporting and bug fixing. Best practices required for building a high quality game, group work, meeting tight deadlines, peer evaluation and giving and receiving constructive criticism are adhered to.

Prerequisites: GAM1550

Co-requisites: GAM1561 and GAM1562 and GAM1563 and GAM1564
Capstone Production: Gameplay Programming The Capstone Project which is a multi-discipline team-based project simulates the entire industry life cycle of a video game in development from concept to completion with a focus on teamwork. Students focus on their preferred discipline of design, art, programming and/or management. Students build on the knowledge gained in Capstone Pre-production and Production Gameplay Programming. Emphasis is placed on character animation, transition control, advanced peripherals, porting to multiple platforms, performance optimization, stress testing, unit testing, bug reporting and bug fixing. Best practices required for building a high quality game, group work, meeting tight deadlines, peer evaluation and giving and receiving constructive criticism are adhered to.

Prerequisites: GAM1550

Co-requisites: GAM1561 and GAM1562 and GAM1563 and GAM1564
90.0
GAM1561 The Capstone Project which is a multi-discipline team-based project simulates the entire industry life cycle of a video game in development from concept to completion with a focus on teamwork. Students focus on their preferred discipline of design, art, programming and/or management. Students continue to research and implement complex special visual effects for their Capstone group project. Advanced shaders, sophisticated cameras, GPU issues relating to performance optimizations, and advanced rendering techniques are studied and implemented in the Capstone group project. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow, best practices, group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and other applicable technologies.

Prerequisites: GAM1551

Co-requisites: GAM1560 and GAM1562 and GAM1563 and GAM1564
Capstone Production: Game and Graphics The Capstone Project which is a multi-discipline team-based project simulates the entire industry life cycle of a video game in development from concept to completion with a focus on teamwork. Students focus on their preferred discipline of design, art, programming and/or management. Students continue to research and implement complex special visual effects for their Capstone group project. Advanced shaders, sophisticated cameras, GPU issues relating to performance optimizations, and advanced rendering techniques are studied and implemented in the Capstone group project. Strong emphasis is placed on the game development pipeline, workflow, best practices, group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and other applicable technologies.

Prerequisites: GAM1551

Co-requisites: GAM1560 and GAM1562 and GAM1563 and GAM1564
45.0
GAM1562 The Capstone Project which is a multi-discipline team based project simulates the entire industry life cycle of a video game in development from concept to completion with a focus on teamwork. Students focus on their preferred discipline of design, art, programming and/or management. Students continue into production for their group based projects. Students use the processes, pipelines, art and technology they created in Pre-production to move into full production. Focus is on project management and being an effective and active participant of a team. The development is managed using Agile methodologies tailored to a production environment. Continuous play testing and Quality Assurance workflows are put in place. Business and legal issues for game development are also covered, such as company start-ups and funding options, IP ownership, licensing, contracts and marketing. Students focus on best practices required for building a high quality game, group work, meeting tight deadlines, peer evaluation, and giving and receiving constructive criticism.

Prerequisites: GAM1552

Co-requisites: GAM1560 and GAM1561 and GAM1563 and GAM1564
Capstone Production: Project Management The Capstone Project which is a multi-discipline team based project simulates the entire industry life cycle of a video game in development from concept to completion with a focus on teamwork. Students focus on their preferred discipline of design, art, programming and/or management. Students continue into production for their group based projects. Students use the processes, pipelines, art and technology they created in Pre-production to move into full production. Focus is on project management and being an effective and active participant of a team. The development is managed using Agile methodologies tailored to a production environment. Continuous play testing and Quality Assurance workflows are put in place. Business and legal issues for game development are also covered, such as company start-ups and funding options, IP ownership, licensing, contracts and marketing. Students focus on best practices required for building a high quality game, group work, meeting tight deadlines, peer evaluation, and giving and receiving constructive criticism.

Prerequisites: GAM1552

Co-requisites: GAM1560 and GAM1561 and GAM1563 and GAM1564
45.0
GAM1563 The Capstone Project which is a multi-discipline team based project simulates the entire industry life cycle of a video game in development from concept to completion with a focus on teamwork. Students focus on their preferred discipline of design, art, programming and/or management. Increased emphasis is placed on the polishing and refinement of game assets for their Capstone group project. Students are also taught refined animation techniques that are used to simulate life in finished game assets. Game development pipeline, workflow, best practices, group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and other applicable technologies are strongly emphasized.

Prerequisites: GAM1522 and GAM1553

Co-requisites: GAM1560 and GAM1561 and GAM1562 and GAM1564
Capstone Production: Game Assets The Capstone Project which is a multi-discipline team based project simulates the entire industry life cycle of a video game in development from concept to completion with a focus on teamwork. Students focus on their preferred discipline of design, art, programming and/or management. Increased emphasis is placed on the polishing and refinement of game assets for their Capstone group project. Students are also taught refined animation techniques that are used to simulate life in finished game assets. Game development pipeline, workflow, best practices, group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and other applicable technologies are strongly emphasized.

Prerequisites: GAM1522 and GAM1553

Co-requisites: GAM1560 and GAM1561 and GAM1562 and GAM1564
45.0
GAM1564 The Capstone Project which is a multi-discipline team-based project simulates the entire industry life cycle of a video game in development from concept to completion with a focus on teamwork. Students focus on their preferred discipline of design, art, programming and/or management. Students continue to be mentored by faculty and industry topic experts to implement and verify game mechanics through play testing while in production. The Capstone group projects then proceed to Post-production where their titles are polished for release. Culmination of the Capstone project results in a release of a high quality video game that runs on various platforms. Game development pipeline, workflow, best practices, group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and other applicable technologies are strongly emphasized. Students exhibit the ability to work as an effective team player and consistently meet milestone deliverables.

Prerequisites: GAM1554

Co-requisites: GAM1560 and GAM1561 and GAM1562 and GAM1563
Capstone Game Studio II The Capstone Project which is a multi-discipline team-based project simulates the entire industry life cycle of a video game in development from concept to completion with a focus on teamwork. Students focus on their preferred discipline of design, art, programming and/or management. Students continue to be mentored by faculty and industry topic experts to implement and verify game mechanics through play testing while in production. The Capstone group projects then proceed to Post-production where their titles are polished for release. Culmination of the Capstone project results in a release of a high quality video game that runs on various platforms. Game development pipeline, workflow, best practices, group work, presentations to peers, constructive peer review and other applicable technologies are strongly emphasized. Students exhibit the ability to work as an effective team player and consistently meet milestone deliverables.

Prerequisites: GAM1554

Co-requisites: GAM1560 and GAM1561 and GAM1562 and GAM1563
45.0

Fees & Expenses

Total Fees for the first year of the program:

Domestic tuition/ancillary fees: $7,337.76. *

International tuition/ancillary Fees: $16,887.76. *

* Amounts include tuition fee, program specific lab and material fees, applicable eText fees, Students` Association fees and compulsory ancillary fees. Fees are subject to change. For detailed fees information please visit http://www.algonquincollege.com/ro/pay/tuition-and-expenses

Note: For further information regarding your books, please visit http://www.algonquincollege.com/etexts

Books and supplies cost approximately $2,475 in the first year, $2,275 in the second year and $1,925 in the third year. Computers and supplies can be purchased directly from Algonquin`s New Technology Store.

Admission Requirements 

College Eligibility

  • Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent. Applicants with an OSSD showing senior English and/or Mathematics courses at the Basic Level, or with Workplace or Open courses, will be tested to determine their  eligibility for admission; OR
  • Academic and Career Entrance (ACE) certificate; OR
  • General Educational Development (GED) certificate; OR
  • Mature Student status (19 years of age or older and without a high school diploma at the start of the program). Eligibility may be determined by academic achievement testing for which a fee of $50 (subject to change) will be charged.

Program Eligibility

  • English, Grade 12 (ENG4C or equivalent).
  • Mathematics, Grade 12 (MAP4C or equivalent).
  • Mathematics, Grade 12 (MCT4C is recommended).
  • A senior credit in physics is recommended.
  • Applicants with International transcripts must provide proof of the
    subject specific requirements noted above along with proof of either:

    IELTS-International English Language Testing Service-Overall band of 6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in each band.

    OR

    TOEFL-Internet-based (iBT)-overall 80, with the minimum of 20 in each component: Reading 20; Listening: 20 Speaking: 20, Writing: 20

Should the number of qualified applicants exceed the number of available places, applicants are selected on the basis of their proficiency in English and mathematics. Applicants should have basic computer skills such as keyboard proficiency, Internet browsing and searching, and proficiency with an office software suite (word processing, spreadsheets, etc.) prior to the start of the program. While programming experience is not a requirement to enter the program, aptitude for programming is necessary and would include strong language, problem solving and logic skills. This is often demonstrated by skill and enjoyment in solving word problems in math.

Applicants who have been out of school for a period of time are encouraged to take a refresher course in mathematics, prior to the start of
classes. Refresher/upgrading courses are available through Academic Upgrading courses, the Centre for Continuing and Online Learning and through local school boards.

Application Information

Applications to full-time day programs must be submitted with official transcripts showing completion of the academic admission requirements through:

ontariocolleges.ca
60 Corporate Court
Guelph, Ontario
N1G 5J3
1-888-892-2228

Students currently enrolled in an Ontario secondary school should contact their Guidance Office to apply. For all other applicants, applications are available online at ontariocolleges.ca . A $95 fee applies.

Applications for Fall Term, Winter Term and Spring Term admission received by February 1 will be given equal consideration. Applications received after February 1 will be processed on a first-come, first-served basis as long as places are available.

International applicants applying from out-of-country can obtain the International Student Application Form at https://xweb.algonquincollege.com/FormIE/index.aspx or by contacting the Registrar`s Office.

For further information on the admissions process, contact:

Registrar`s Office
Algonquin College
1385 Woodroffe Ave, Room C150
Ottawa, ON K2G 1V8
Telephone: 613-727-0002
Toll-free: 1-800-565-4723
TTY: 613-727-7766
Fax: 613-727-7632
Email: AskUs@algonquincollege.com

Additional Information

For more information, please email the Program Coordinators, Jodi Tilley at tilleyj@algonquincollege.com  or Dushan Horvat, horvatd@algonquincollege.com  or David McCue, mccued@algonquincollege.com  or Diane Banks, Marketing Officer, at ext. 2510 or banksd@algonquincollege.com .
Every attempt is made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this publication. The College reserves the right to modify or cancel any course, program, fee, timetable, or campus location at any time