Child and Youth Care


The Child and Youth Care program at Algonquin College provides comprehensive student success initiatives, including a one-week program orientation, academic advising, academic coaching and peer mentoring. ALSO AVAILABLE FULL-TIME ONLINE

Mobile DeviceBring Your Own Device (BYOD): As a student in this on-campus program, you will require a mobile computing device that meets the specifications outlined by your program at http://algonquincollege.com/byod (Please note this was previously referred to as a Mobile Learning Program)

Another Mobile Device ImageeTextbooks: As a student in a program that has adopted etextbooks, your required texts and digital resources will be provided to you at the beginning of each term (with the exception of general education electives). For more information and associated fees, go to http://www.algonquincollege.com/etextbooks/

Ontario College Advanced Diploma
3 Year(s)

Program Code: 0476X01FWO
Academic Year: 2016/2017


Our Program

This three-year Ontario College Advanced Diploma program prepares students to develop and implement a wide range of prevention, intervention and treatment strategies to facilitate positive change in children, youth and their families. Using a concurrent delivery model, this unique program allows students to apply theoretical concepts of healthy development, therapeutic programming, child and youth care interventions and counselling in their field placement experiences. During the program, students complete four terms of field placement which is supported through coursework, tailor-made seminar classes and comprehensive onsite supervision.

Supplemented with additional knowledge in outdoor activity facilitation, group work and specific client populations, graduates are positioned to work in a wide variety of clinical, community and educational settings. Graduates may be employed as frontline child and youth counsellors, residential workers, educational assistants and community support workers.

Applicants with a university degree in the social sciences or a two-year college diploma in a human services program (such as Developmental Service Worker, Social Service Worker, or Early Childhood Education) may be admitted directly into the second year of the program (Level 03). To be considered for Direct Entry, applicants must also submit acceptable proof of at least 160 hours of documented paid or volunteer experience with children and/or youth in a recognized community agency.

Bring Your Own Device (BYOD): Students are expected to have and use a laptop or mobile computing device when registered in this on-campus program. Hardware and software specifications required by your program are outlined at http://algonquincollege.com/byod. Mobile devices/laptops and supplies can be purchased directly from Algonquin`s New Technology Store at educational rates.

SUCCESS FACTORS

This program is well-suited for students who:
  • Are able to cope with stress and manage crisis situations.
  • Are compassionate and committed to making a difference in the lives of children, youth, families and the community.
  • Are capable of contributing as team members in a wide range of dynamic environments.
  • Are energetic, flexible, open-minded, creative and responsible.
  • Have an interest in working with children and youth who face challenges, such as addictions, mental health, abuse, trauma and learning exceptionalities.
  • Are committed to becoming skilled and effective communicators in both the written and spoken word.

Your Career

Graduates may secure employment in an ever-increasing range of settings that promote optimal development of children, youth and their families. As part of an inter-professional team, child and youth care practitioners are front-line professionals in residential care facilities, mental health treatment centres, shelters, school programs, therapeutic foster care environments, community-based services/resource centres and youth justice services.

FUTURE STUDY OPTIONS: The program is an excellent foundation for future studies in psychology, sociology, child and youth care studies, social work and education.

Learning Outcomes

The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to:

  1. Develop and maintain relationships with children, youth and their families, applying principles of relational practice and respecting their unique life space, cultural and human diversity.
  2. Assess and respond to the strengths and needs of children and youth, including complex responses impacted by developmental, environmental, physical, emotional, social and mental health challenges in order to promote positive change.
  3. Analyze and evaluate the impact of the inter-relationship among family, social service, justice and community systems on children, youth and their families and use this information in the planning of holistic care and in the reduction of systemic barriers.
  4. Plan, implement and evaluate interventions using evidence-informed practices in the areas of therapeutic milieu and programming, and group work to promote resiliency and to enhance development in children, youth and their families.
  5. Advocate for the right of children, youth and their families and maintain an anti-oppression perspective and cultural competence in diverse cultural contexts.
  6. Apply communication, teamwork and organizational skills within the interprofessional team and with community partners to enhance the quality of service in child and youth care practice.
  7. Develop and implement self-care strategies using self-inquiry and reflection processes to promote self-awareness and to enhance practice as a child and youth care practitioner.
  8. Use evidence-based research, professional development resources and supervision models to support professional growth and lifelong learning.
  9. Identify and apply discipline-specific practices that contribute to the local and global community through social responsibility, economic commitment and environmental stewardship.

Courses

Programs at Algonquin College are delivered using a variety of instruction modes. Courses may be offered in the classroom or lab, entirely online, or in a hybrid mode which combines classroom sessions with online learning activities. Upon registration, each full-time student is provided an Algonquin email account which is used to communicate important information about program or course events.
Level: 01 Hours
ENL1813S Communications I Communication remains an essential skill sought by employers, regardless of discipline or field of study. Using a practical, vocation-oriented approach, students focus on meeting the requirements of effective communication. Students practice writing, speaking, reading, listening, locating and documenting information, and using technology to communicate professionally. Students develop and strengthen communication skills that contribute to success in both educational and workplace environments. 45.0
FAM1054 Introduction to Child and Youth Care Children, youth, families, and communities may require support from child and youth care practitioners in order to lead healthy lives. Students develop an understanding of the history of the child and youth care profession, roles and responsibilities of child and youth care practitioners, strengths and needs of clients, and communities, professional conduct and personal self-awareness for becoming an effective child and youth care practitioner. 45.0
FAM1058 Field Preparation Seminar I Students explore the professional role of the child and youth care practitioner within the community. Students develop basic skills in observation, documentation, facilitation and professional deportment. Course materials create opportunities for students to practise the skills required to be successful in future field placements. 30.0
FAM1066 Child Development Child development refers to the physical, cognitive, and social and emotional changes that occur in human beings between conception and 12 years of age. The student examines the phases of child development from the prenatal period to early adolescence. The importance of prevention and intervention in healthy development is explored by linking theory to child and youth care practice. Developmental stages, heredity, culture, and environmental influences are addressed with emphasis placed on the interdependency between the physical, cognitive and social/emotional milestones in childhood. 45.0
FAM1258 Technology Tools for Child and Youth Care Practitioners With the increasing application of technology in our day-to-day lives, child and youth care practitioners are required to utilize and be aware of the impact of this technology on their clients. Students experience hands-on learning in where they explore the issues that technology brings to the child and youth care field. Students gain the skills to work with technology and use it as a tool for being a successful college student and child and youth care practitioner. 30.0
FAM1702 Children and Youth in Society Children and youth play a valuable role in Canadian society. Students develop an understanding of societal institutions and view young people within a sociological framework. An opportunity for students to learn the social, economic, cultural and individual factors that influence young people in Canadian society is provided. 45.0
Level: 02 Hours
ENL1902F Professional Communication for Child and Youth Care Practitioners Writing legally appropriate documents, advocating for clients and communicating professionally are critical aspects of the role of the child and youth worker. Students write letters of advocacy and use case studies to write and evaluate field-specific reports. As well, they use music, movies, books and other tools to promote discussion of sensitive issues and to help clients come to an understanding of themselves and others.

Prerequisites: ENL1813S and FAM1058
45.0
FAM0001 Principles of Psychology Understanding self and others is essential in promoting healthy interactions, and success in personal and professional relationships. Students investigate the key concepts associated with the study of psychology. Students develop an understanding of research methodologies and ethics, motivation and emotion, personality theories, memory systems, social learning theories and theories of stress.

Prerequisites: ENL1813S and FAM1058
45.0
FAM0013 Adolescent Development Adolescence is a distinct phase of development and one in which young people experience rapid growth. Physical, cognitive, social, and moral development of adolescents is explored in the contexts of family, peers, school, work and the media. Students begin to identify pertinent issues affecting adolescent development from a child and youth care practice perspective.

Prerequisites: ENL1813S and FAM1058
45.0
FAM1255 Field Preparation Seminar II: Community Service-Learning Building on previous field preparation work, students acquire a deeper awareness of the role of the child and youth care practitioner within a wide variety of settings. Students further develop necessary skills in client engagement, therapeutic activities, advocacy and teamwork. Through a practical project that links students with a community agency, students plan and implement a program that benefits the agency with which they partner.

Prerequisites: ENL1813S and FAM1058
45.0
FAM1259 Diversity in Canadian Society In a rapidly shrinking world, understanding diversity is becoming increasingly important. Students explore concepts of diversity and inclusion as related to culture, race, religion and social class at the personal and societal levels. Students develop an appreciation of historical and current groups immigrating to Canada's rich cultural mosaic, as well as their own ethnocentricity. Students develop the knowledge and attitudes to succeed within today's global society.

Prerequisites: ENL1813S and FAM1058
45.0
FAM1271 Sexual Health and Development Sexuality is an integral part of the lives of child and youth care practitioners and the clients and families they serve. Students review information related to the social, emotional and physiological aspects of human sexuality which affect children and youth. Students explore their values and attitudes about sexuality and practise becoming comfortable discussing this important subject. Students learn to identify issues and engage clients in healthy and positive discussions about sexuality. 45.0
Level: 03 Hours
FAM1050 Therapeutic Activities Therapeutic programming is one of the core elements in child and youth care practice. Students practise developing and facilitating therapeutic activities within the therapeutic milieu. Students explore learning principles, how behaviour is modified and basic program development.

Prerequisites: ENL1902F and FAM0001 and FAM0013 and FAM1054 and FAM1058 and FAM1066 and FAM1255 and FAM1258 and FAM1259 and FAM1271 and FAM1702

Co-requisites: FAM1068 and FAM1075
42.0
FAM1052 Youth in Conflict with the Law Vulnerable and at-risk youth are often involved in the justice system and child and youth care practitioners come into contact with these youth in a variety of work settings. Students explore the multifaceted profile of justice-involved youth, the court process and current legislation which governs legal sanctions. Course materials, discussion and case application are aimed at ensuring students are familiar with best practices when intervening with justice-involved youth. Guest speakers provide a focus on agencies in Ottawa who serve this special population.

Prerequisites: ENL1902F and FAM0001 and FAM0013 and FAM1054 and FAM1058 and FAM1066 and FAM1255 and FAM1258 and FAM1259 and FAM1271 and FAM1702
28.0
FAM1064 Child and Youth Care Interventions Children and youth in crisis require professionals to intervene in a safe, proactive and effective manner. Students identify the stages in the model of crisis and corresponding intervention strategies. Role plays and physical intervention demonstrations are aimed at ensuring students are equipped to intervene safely with clients exhibiting behaviour management issues. Upon successful completion, students earn a certification in crisis intervention.

Prerequisites: ENL1902F and FAM0001 and FAM0013 and FAM1054 and FAM1058 and FAM1066 and FAM1255 and FAM1258 and FAM1259 and FAM1271 and FAM1702
42.0
FAM1068 Field Integration Seminar I The integration of theory, field-related issues and personal development is essential for students to formalize a basic understanding of how our community, clients and professionals work together to effect positive change. Students learn to identify, practise and adapt various clinical, organizational and personal skills in a solution-focused manner. Students are enabled to function effectively as an entry-level student in a child and youth care setting.

Prerequisites: ENL1902F and FAM0001 and FAM0013 and FAM1054 and FAM1058 and FAM1066 and FAM1255 and FAM1258 and FAM1259 and FAM1271 and FAM1702

Co-requisites: FAM1050 and FAM1075
26.0
FAM1070 Outdoor Activities I With the focus of promoting optimal social, emotional and physical development, child and youth care practitioners plan and implement outdoor recreational and therapeutic activities as a means to achieve goals and encourage values related to healthy lifestyles and development. Students plan and participate in an active camping trip. Through this trip experience, students develop knowledge and skills in basic camping tasks, outdoor therapeutic programming, team work and safety procedures. Demonstrations and skill practice sessions are aimed at exposing students to new activities, and ensuring their comfort in participating and leading youth in summer outdoor adventures.

Prerequisites: ENL1813S and ENL1902F and FAM0001 and FAM1054 and FAM1058 and FAM1066 and FAM1067 and FAM1255 and FAM1258 and FAM1259 and FAM1271 and FAM1702
30.0
FAM1075 Field Practice I Professional development of a child and youth care practitioner is enhanced through the integration of theory and practice. Students identify, adapt and incorporate theory and skills of child and youth care practitioners while completing a placement in a school-based setting. Each field experience provides unique opportunities to understand and develop vocational skills. Students learn the importance of building therapeutic relationships with children and youth, demonstrating clear communication through professional reflections, and using basic intervention techniques to influence behaviour and self-awareness.

Prerequisites: ENL1902F and FAM0001 and FAM0013 and FAM1054 and FAM1058 and FAM1066 and FAM1255 and FAM1258 and FAM1259 and FAM1271 and FAM1702

Co-requisites: FAM1050 and FAM1068
231.0
FAM1082 Counselling Skills Child and youth care practitioners supporting children, youth, and families require professional communication and field-appropriate counselling skills. Students develop self-reflective processes to assist them in relational practice. Micro counselling skills are developed in a lab-like environment.

Prerequisites: ENL1902F and FAM0001 and FAM0013 and FAM1054 and FAM1058 and FAM1066 and FAM1255 and FAM1258 and FAM1259 and FAM1271 and FAM1702
42.0
Level: 04 Hours
FAM1060 Therapeutic Programming Cognitive behavioural theory is the foundation for many programs delivered to the clients of child and youth care practitioners. Learning activities help students develop an understanding of the connection between cognition, emotions and behaviour. Students build on their knowledge and skills to develop individualized programs for children and youth and implement cognitive-behavioural based activities with clients at placement. Students develop their role as a programmer.

Prerequisites: FAM1050 and FAM1052 and FAM1064 and FAM1068 and FAM1070 and FAM1075 and FAM1082

Co-requisites: FAM1078 and FAM1256
45.0
FAM1078 Field Integration Seminar II Professional development of child and youth care practitioners continues with the extension of the learning opportunities that integrate theory and practice. Students learn to identify, practise and adapt various vocational skills in a solution-focused manner. The focus on intervention skills with clients, self-awareness, and the professional role as a child and youth care practitioner and a constructive team member sets the foundation of learning for the intermediate child and youth care student.

Prerequisites: FAM1050 and FAM1052 and FAM1064 and FAM1068 and FAM1070 and FAM1075 and FAM1082

Co-requisites: FAM1060 and FAM1256
28.0
FAM1087 Child Abuse and the Law Issues of child abuse and neglect are part of all communities. Students examine attitudes about violence against children through reflective practice. Insight into risk factors, intervention, documentation and legal reporting issues is developed through lecture and application of learning.

Prerequisites: FAM1052 and FAM1064 and FAM1068 and FAM1070 and FAM1075 and FAM1082
45.0
FAM1097 Young People and Mental Health Mental health challenges touch the lives of many. Students explore mental health disorders commonly diagnosed in today's children and youth. Specific emphasis is on etiology, symptom recognition and strategies to promote mental health. Students explore the legal guidelines surrounding the treatment of mental health issues, as well as their attitudes around stigma and mental health. Students enhance their knowledge of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorders, eating disorders, mood disorders and anxiety disorders.

Prerequisites: FAM1050 and FAM1052 and FAM1064 and FAM1068 and FAM1070 and FAM1075 and FAM1082
45.0
FAM1256 Field Practice II Professional development of a child and youth care practitioner continues with the integration of theory and practice. Each field experience provides unique opportunities to understand and develop clinical, organizational and personal skills. Learning continues in the same setting as Field Practice I, with the expectation to further develop understanding and skills of therapeutic activities and programs, and expand specific intervention techniques pertinent to the clients' and agencies' strengths and needs in more complex situations.

Prerequisites: FAM1050 and FAM1052 and FAM1064 and FAM1068 and FAM1070 and FAM1075 and FAM1082

Co-requisites: FAM1060 and FAM1078
294.0
Choose one from equivalencies: Hours
GED0476 General Education Elective Students choose one course, from a group of general education electives, which meets one of the following five theme requirements: Arts in Society, Civic Life, Social and Cultural Understanding, Personal Understanding, and Science and Technology.

Equivalencies: ARC9001 or DSN2001 or ENL7643 or ENV0002 or FIN2300 or GED1896 or GED5002 or GED5004 or GED5005 or GED5006 or GED5009 or GED5200 or GED5300 or GED6022 or GEN1001 or GEN1957 or GEN2000 or GEN2003 or GEN2007 or HIS0001 or HIS2000 or HOS2228 or LIB1982 or MGT7330 or MVM8800 or PSI0003 or RAD2001
45.0
Level: 05 Hours
ENL2028 Research Writing Skills Effective research and writing skills are essential for developing programming and projects that meet the needs of a variety of clients in the field of child and youth care. Students perform research to conduct literature reviews; evaluate, summarize, and document sources according to APA standards, as well as produce accurate and reliable professional projects. Working individually, as well as in groups, students research, critically analyze and document topical issues to compose a research paper.

Prerequisites: ENL1902F and FAM1060 and FAM1078 and FAM1087 and FAM1097 and FAM1256
30.0
FAM0033 Field Integration Seminar III Professional development of child and youth care practitioners continues with the extension of the learning opportunities that integrate theory and practice. Students learn to identify, practise and adapt various vocational skills in a solution-focused manner. The focus is on advanced client engagement, assessment of complex client strengths and needs, and intervention skills with individual clients and groups.

Prerequisites: FAM1060 and FAM1078 and FAM1087 and FAM1097 and FAM1256

Co-requisites: FAM1257
28.0
FAM1062 Substance Abuse The clients of child and youth care practitioners frequently experience challenges in the area of addictions. Students gain basic knowledge regarding substance abuse, addiction and recovery. Students explore their values and attitudes about the use and abuse of drugs and alcohol. Special emphasis is placed on intervention strategies with youth. Students gain insight, awareness and the understanding necessary to interact positively with addicted clients and their families.

Prerequisites: FAM1060 and FAM1078 and FAM1087 and FAM1097 and FAM1256
30.0
FAM1081 Therapeutic Group Facilitation Working in a group milieu is a key component in child and youth care practice. Students explore the process of establishing groups and the facilitation and evaluation of therapeutic groups in both formal and informal settings. Through participation in a lab group, students observe and document group process and experience the roles of the group leader and group member. Through self-reflection and applied practice, students acquire the skills, and attitudes necessary to facilitate therapeutic groups.

Prerequisites: FAM1060 and FAM1078 and FAM1087 and FAM1097 and FAM1256
45.0
FAM1257 Field Practice III Professional development of a child and youth care practitioner continues with the integration of theory and practice. Each therapeutic field experience provides unique opportunities to understand and develop vocational skills. Focus is on understanding how community systems, professionals and clients work together to promote positive change. Students learn to select and apply advanced skills in therapeutic settings, refine client engagement skills and relate to clients in more complex situations.

Prerequisites: FAM1060 and FAM1078 and FAM1087 and FAM1097 and FAM1256

Co-requisites: FAM0033
336.0
FAM1270 Advanced Child and Youth Care Interventions Child and youth care practitioners use a variety of intervention techniques when working with children and youth in order to assist with their social, emotional, cognitive and behavioural development. Students develop the knowledge and skills to enhance their ability to effectively and safely intervene with clients who are experiencing challenges with their mental health, coping skills and self-regulation. Using role-play, practical application and demonstration in a lab-like environment, students learn and practise these advanced intervention skills prior to using them in their field placements and professional practice.

Prerequisites: FAM1060 or FAM1078 or FAM1097 or FAM1256
45.0
Level: 06 Hours
FAM0014 Independent Research Project Students have identified topics in the field of child and youth care practice that they wish to explore in more detail. Students plan, develop and write a group program manual grounded in current theory and research. Students engage in detailed research and are supported through individual meetings with the course instructor. A group program is produced by each student that is potentially marketable to the social services community.

Prerequisites: ENL2028 and FAM0033 and FAM1062 and FAM1081 and FAM1257 and FAM1270
30.0
FAM0042 Field Practice IV Professional development of child and youth care practitioners continues to be highlighted. Students identify, practise, adapt and incorporate theory and skills. Students gain unique opportunities to develop vocational skills at an employment-ready level. The focus is on the cumulative knowledge and professional skills for client engagement, intervention skills and team skills that support the ecological perspective of the community. The outcome is a professional profile that uniquely reflects the students' readiness for frontline child and youth care practice.

Prerequisites: ENL2028 and FAM0033 and FAM1062 and FAM1081 and FAM1257 and FAM1270

Co-requisites: FAM0043
336.0
FAM0043 Field Integration Seminar IV Professional development of child and youth care practitioners incorporates all student learning opportunities through integration of theory and practice. Students learn to identify, practise and adapt employment-ready vocational skills in a solution-focused manner. The focus is on the cumulative knowledge and professional skills for client engagement, intervention skills and team skills that support the ecological perspective of the community. The outcome is a professional profile that uniquely reflects the students' readiness for frontline child and youth care practice.

Prerequisites: ENL2028 and FAM0033 and FAM1062 and FAM1081 and FAM1257 and FAM1270

Co-requisites: FAM0042
26.0
FAM1089 Professional Issues and Development Child and youth care practitioners practise within agency and professional guidelines. Students develop the knowledge and skills to advocate for clients, deal with ethical dilemmas and become job ready. The exploration of current professional issues in the community build a bridge between academics and securing employment in the field.

Prerequisites: ENL2028 and FAM0033 and FAM1062 and FAM1081 and FAM1087 and FAM1257 and FAM1270
42.0
FAM1096 Family Interventions Families in need of community-based supports rely on teams of professionals for care. Child and youth care practitioners are an integrated component in providing support for families through promoting strengths and resilience. Students apply an ecological perspective to family work, as well as examine a variety of family intervention modalities.

Prerequisites: ENL2028 and FAM0033 and FAM1062 and FAM1081 and FAM1257 and FAM1270
42.0
FAM1100 Outdoor Activities II Changes in the seasons do not preclude the use of outdoor activities to promote healthy lifestyles through positive social, emotional, and physical development, but they do require more detailed planning and preparation for the activities. Students plan and participate in an active winter experience. Through this exercise, students develop knowledge and skills in modifying basic outdoor skills, outdoor therapeutic programming and safety procedures to adhere to winter conditions. Demonstrations and skill practice sessions are aimed at exposing students to new activities and ensuring their comfort in participating and leading youth in winter outdoor activities.

Prerequisites: ENL2028 and FAM0033 and FAM1062 and FAM1081 and FAM1257 and FAM1270
30.0

Fees & Expenses   

2016/2017 Academic Year

Total Fees for the first year of the program:

Domestic tuition/ancillary fees: $5,274.30. *

International tuition/ancillary Fees: $14,800.34. *

* Amounts include tuition fee, program specific lab and material fees, applicable eText fees, Students` Association fees and compulsory ancillary fees. Fees are subject to change. For detailed fees information please visit algonquincollege.com/ro/pay/tuition-and-expenses

Note: For further information regarding your books, please visit http://www.algonquincollege.com/etexts

This program is an e-text program. Textbook costs are included in your fees. Supplies cost approximately $1,000 in the first year, $700 in second year and $550 in the third year. Additional expenses related to field placement requirements: ParaMed clearance, police records check, health immunizations and first aid are the responsibility of the student. The ParaMed documentation clearance fee is approximately $50 and is set by ParaMed, a third party provider.

Admission Requirements   

2017/2018 Academic Year

College Eligibility

  • Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent. Applicants with an OSSD showing senior English and/or Mathematics courses at the Basic Level, or with Workplace or Open courses, will be tested to determine their eligibility for admission; OR
  • Academic and Career Entrance (ACE) certificate; OR
  • General Educational Development (GED) certificate; OR
  • Mature Student status (19 years of age or older and without a high school diploma at the start of the program). Eligibility may be determined by academic achievement testing for which a fee of $50 (subject to change) will be charged.

Program Eligibility

  • English, Grade 12 (ENG4C or equivalent) with a minimum grade of 65% or higher.
  • Applicants with International transcripts must provide proof of the subject specific requirements noted above along with proof of either:
    • IELTS-International English Language Testing Service-Overall band of 6.5 with a minimum of 6.0 in each band. OR
    • TOEFL-Internet-based (iBT)-overall 88, with the minimum of 22 in each component: Reading 22; Listening: 22 Speaking: 22, Writing: 22

Should the number of qualified applicants exceed the number of available places, applicants will be selected on the basis of their proficiency in English.

    Eligibility for Direct Entry to Second Year:

    • University degree in Social Sciences or a two-year diploma in a Human Services program. AND
    • 160 hours of documented work or volunteer experience with children and youth in a recognized community agency.

    Health Requirements:

    The physical and emotional health of each applicant to the program must be such that he or she can successfully cope with the program of instruction including the demands of field placement (e.g. stress and time management). Individuals who have concerns about their ability to meet these requirements should contact the coordinator of the program prior to submitting an
    application.

    Police Records Check Documentation

    Though not an admission requirement, applicants must note important information listed below regarding Police Records Check program requirements. Students must provide the College with a current Police Records Check for Service with the Vulnerable Sector (PRCSVS) prior to the deadline identified by the department and students are responsible for any associated costs. If this documentation is not submitted on time, students may not be placed and registration in the program will be jeopardized. If you register in the program without a clear PRCSVS and as a result are unable to participate in placement, you will not be able to graduate and will be asked to withdraw.

    Field Placement Eligibility:

    Field placements occur only in second and third year of the program.

    To be eligible for placement, you must submit proof of Standard First Aid certification, CPR level C, PRCSVS, and complete immunizations through ParaMed. ParaMed services are the third party provider who collects all field placement documentation for the Community Studies department.

    Promotional Status:

    All courses in Level 01 and Level 02 (Year 1) must be successfully completed before entering Level 03 (Year 2) of the program. In Level 03 to Level 06, students must pass all courses to be granted admission to the following level. Special consideration may be given to those who are unsuccessful in one course. If exceptions are granted based on extenuating circumstances, the students must pass the course in the spring or summer semester prior to returning to the following year of the program. Given the concurrent model of the program, students must be in field while completing course work.

    Application Information

    Applications to full-time day programs must be submitted with official transcripts showing completion of the academic admission requirements through:

    ontariocolleges.ca
    60 Corporate Court
    Guelph, Ontario
    N1G 5J3
    1-888-892-2228

    Students currently enrolled in an Ontario secondary school should notify their Guidance Office prior to their online application at www.ontariocolleges.ca

    Applications for Fall Term and Winter Term admission received by February 1 will be given equal consideration. Applications received after February 1 will be processed on a first-come, first-served basis as long as places are available.

    International applicants applying from out-of-country can obtain the International Student Application Form at https://xweb.algonquincollege.com/FormIE/index.aspx or by contacting the Registrar`s Office.

    For further information on the admissions process, contact:

    Registrar`s Office
    Algonquin College
    1385 Woodroffe Ave, Room C150
    Ottawa, ON K2G 1V8
    Telephone: 613-727-0002
    Toll-free: 1-800-565-4723
    TTY: 613-727-7766
    Fax: 613-727-7632
    Email: AskUs@algonquincollege.com

    Additional Information

    The Child and Youth Care program consists of courses that are delivered in a variety of formats including face-to-face in a classroom, hybrid (combination of classroom and online learning) and online courses. Students participate in all three types of learning. Students also participate in laboratory and field placement learning activities.

    Class schedules vary from term to term and courses may be scheduled between the hours of 8 a.m. and 10 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. Friday. Classes for first-year students run Monday through Friday. Second and third-year classes take place on campus two days per week. Field placements occur off campus three days per week. All-second year students are required to complete a school-based field placement. Third-year placements are based on community capacity. Some field placements require the student to be available for an evening or weekend shift.

    This program is also available through the Centre for Continuing and Online Learning on a full-time and part-time online basis - Year One only. Successful students then transfer to Year Two on campus full-time. Year Two on campus has a September-only start date.

    Graduates may be eligible to apply their academic credits toward further study at many postsecondary institutions. For specific articulation agreements please visit our website at algonquincollege.com/degree.pathways.

    ACADEMIC PROBATION

    Students who have two or more F grades in a given term or whose term grade point average falls below 1.7 are considered to be on academic probation (Policy AA14 Grading System). This requires the student to meet with their academic advisor or coordinator to sign a learning contract which identifies the conditions which must be met to continue in the program. Students who do not meet the terms of their learning contract are withdrawn from the program.

    For program information, contact the Program Coordinator, Vicki Grisim at 613-727-4723 ext. 5170 or grisimv@algonquincollege.com.

    Every attempt is made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this publication. The College reserves the right to modify or cancel any course, program, fee, timetable, or campus location at any time